• Appendix I


  •   
  • FileName: AppIBPhysSyl.pdf [preview-online]
    • Abstract: Appendix ISection B. Course SyllabiDepartment of Physics ABET Course Syllabi were formatted to conform to the EngineeringPhysics ABET Program Outcomes.The Electrical Engineering ABET Course Syllabi were formatted to conform to the EE ABET

Download the ebook

Appendix I
Section B. Course Syllabi
Department of Physics ABET Course Syllabi were formatted to conform to the Engineering
Physics ABET Program Outcomes.
The Electrical Engineering ABET Course Syllabi were formatted to conform to the EE ABET
Program Outcomes.
The Mechanical Engineering ABET Course Syllabi were formatted to conform to the ME ABET
Program Outcomes.
The Program Outcomes (a) thru (k) are the same for the EP, EE, and ME programs. However, the
Educational Objectives for the three programs differ slightly.
Other Course Syllabi are not formatted to the ABET format as they do not measure any of the EP
Program Outcomes.
117
Syllabus, Physics 213, Mechanics, 3 credits
Designation: Required for undergraduate Physics majors and Engineering Physics
majors.
Course Description: Newtonian Mechanics.
Prerequisite: None. Co requisite: Math 191.
Required Text: Knight, Physics: A contemporary perspective, Addison Wesley & Co., 1st
Edition, Volume 1.
Class Web Pages: This course will use WebCT, http://salsa.nmsu.edu
Course Objectives: In this course you will learn the fundamental ideas underlying
classical mechanics (Newton’s laws and conservation laws) the application of these ideas
to quantitative physics problems, and the relationship between the models physicists use
and real-world phenomena.
Topics Covered: Measurement and units; forces in nature, Newton’s laws, kinematic
relationships between position, velocity and acceleration vectors; Newtonian dynamics,
forms of energy; conservation of energy; conservation of momentum; rotational
kinematics and dynamics; statics; oscillations and simple harmonic motion.
Class Schedule: Three 50 minute classes or two 75 minute classes per week; two hour
final exam during exam week.
Contribution of Course to Professional Component: This course sets the foundation for
undergraduate physics and engineering curriculum. Students learn basic physics
mechanics concepts, how to apply them, and how to solve physical problems. The course
provides three credits of physics.
Relationship of Course to Program Outcomes: This course teaches students to:
Apply knowledge of math, science and engineering (Program Outcome a).
Prepared by Drs. Stephen Kanim and Stephen Pate, Spring 2006.
118
Syllabus, Physics 213L, Engineering Physics I Laboratory, 1 credit
Designation: Required for most undergraduate Engineering majors.
Course Description: Elementary laboratory in physics principles which supports the
subject matter in PHYS 213.
Co requisite: PHYS 213.
Required Text: McDermott, Shaffer, et al., Tutorials in Introductory Physics, Prentice
Hall, First Edition. Additional materials will be provided as needed.
Class Web Pages: A class webpage with the syllabus and other information is maintained
at http://physics.nmsu.edu/classes/labs/physics213/physics213l.html
Course Objectives: Students perform a series of experiments which apply the principles
and concepts highlighting the main objectives covered in the coursework for PHYS 213.
Topics Covered: Experiments performed, data collected and analyzed encompassing:
kinematics, dynamics, energy, work, momentum, and their conservation concepts and
rotational motion and extended body problems.
Class Schedule: Two 180 minute lab classes per week; two hour final exam during last
scheduled lab session.
Contribution of Course to Professional Component: Together with PHYS 213, this
course sets the foundation for undergraduate physics and engineering curriculum.
Students perform experiments which illustrate basic physics concepts.
Relationship of Course to Program Outcomes: This course teaches students to:
Design and conduct experiments, and analyze and interpret data (Program Outcome b).
Prepared by: Ms. Christine Pennise and Dr. Stephen Pate, Spring 2006.
119
Syllabus, Physics 214, Electricity and Magnetism, 3 credits
Designation: Required for Physics, Engineering Physics, and B.S. Chemistry &
Biochemistry majors.
Course Description: Charges and matter, the electric field, Gauss’ law, the electric
potential, the magnetic field, Ampere’s law, Faraday’s law, electric circuits, alternating
currents, Maxwell’s equations, and electromagnetic waves.
Prerequisite: Physics 213 or Physics 215. Co requisite: Math 192.
Required Text: Randall Knight, Physics for Scientists and Engineers, Pearson Addison
st
Wesley, 1 Edition.
Class Web Pages: A class webpage with the syllabus and other information maintained
at http://physics.nmsu.edu/~pate/teaching/phys214.
Course Objectives: Students should be able to apply the basic laws of electricity and
magnetism to solve simple problems concerning the motion and distribution of charges.
Topics Covered: Charges and matter, the electric field, Gauss’ law, the electric potential,
the magnetic field, Ampere’s law, Faraday’s law, electric circuits, alternating currents,
Maxwell’s equations, and electromagnetic waves.
Class Schedule: Three 50 minute classes or two 75 minute classes per week; two hour
final exam during exam week.
Contribution of Course to Professional Component: Along with Phys 213, this course
sets the foundation for the undergraduate physics curriculum. Students learn the basic
concepts of electromagnetism, how to apply them, and how to solve physical problems.
The course provides three credits of physics.
Relationship of Course to Program Outcomes: This course teaches students to:
Apply knowledge of math, science and engineering (Program Outcome a).
Prepared by Dr. Stephen Pate, Spring 2006.
120
Syllabus, Physics 214L, Electricity and Magnetism Laboratory, 1 credit
Designation: Required for most undergraduate Engineering majors.
Course Description: Elementary laboratory in physics principles which supports the
subject matter in PHYS 214.
Co requisite: PHYS 214.
Required Text: McDermott, Shaffer, et al., Tutorials in Introductory Physics, Prentice
Hall, First Edition. Additional materials will be provided as needed.
Class Web Pages: A class webpage with the syllabus and other information is maintained
at http://physics.nmsu.edu/classes/labs/physics214/physics214l.html
Course Objectives: Students perform a series of experiments which apply the principles
and concepts highlighting the main objectives covered in the coursework for PHYS 214.
Topics Covered: Experiments performed, data collected and analyzed encompassing:
electrostatics, electric circuits, magnetism, electromagnetism and light, including
geometrical and physical optics.
Class Schedule: Two 180 minute lab classes per week; two hour final exam during last
scheduled lab session.
Contribution of Course to Professional Component: Together with PHYS 214, this
course sets the foundation for undergraduate physics and engineering curriculum.
Students perform experiments which illustrate basic physics concepts.
Relationship of Course to Program Outcomes: This course teaches students to:
Design and conduct experiments, as well as to analyze and interpret data (Program
Outcome b).
Prepared by: Ms. Christine Pennise and Dr. Stephen Pate, Spring 2006.
121
Syllabus, Physics 215, Engineering Physics I, 3 credits
Designation: Required for most undergraduate Engineering majors. Engineering physics
majors may use this as an alternative for Physics 213.
Course Description: Calculus based course of kinematics, work and energy, particle
dynamics, conservation principles, simple harmonic motion.
Prerequisite: Math 191 or equivalent calculus course. This course is calculus based and
students should be able to take basic derivatives.
Required Text: Randall Knight, Physics for Scientists and Engineers, Pearson Addison
Wesley, 1st Edition.
Class Web Pages: A class webpage with the syllabus and other information maintained
at http://physics.nmsu.edu/ph215.
Course Objectives: Students should be able to apply kinematic equations to describe
motion, apply Newton’s laws to describe forces and their effects on motion, apply energy
and momentum concepts and their conservation properties, and define the basic
properties of oscillations and waves.
Topics Covered: Measurement and units; Kinematic relationships between position,
velocity and acceleration; Newton’s Laws; forces; friction; potential and kinetic energy;
conservation of energy; momentum and conservation of momentum; rotational velocity
and acceleration; torque; rotational energy and momentum; gravity and orbits;
oscillations and simple harmonic motion.
Class Schedule: Three 50 minute classes or two 75 minute classes per week; two hour
final exam during exam week.
Contribution of Course to Professional Component: This course sets the foundation for
undergraduate physics and engineering curriculum. Students learn basic physics
mechanics concepts, how to apply them, and how to solve physical problems. The course
provides three credits of physics.
Relationship of Course to Program Outcomes: This course teaches students to:
Apply knowledge of math, science and engineering (Program Outcome a).
Prepared by Drs. Thomas Hearn and Stephen Pate, Spring 2006.
122
Syllabus, Physics 215L, Engineering Physics I Laboratory, 1 credit
Designation: Required for most undergraduate Engineering majors. Engineering physics
majors may use this as an alternative for Physics 213L.
Course Description: Elementary laboratory in physics principles which supports the
subject matter in PHYS 215.
Co requisite: PHYS 215.
Required Text: McDermott, Shaffer, et al., Tutorials in Introductory Physics, Prentice
Hall, First Edition. Additional materials will be provided as needed.
Class Web Pages: A class webpage with the syllabus and other information is maintained
at http://physics.nmsu.edu/classes/labs/physics215/physics215l.html
Course Objectives: Students perform a series of experiments which apply the principles
and concepts highlighting the main objectives covered in the coursework for PHYS 215.
Topics Covered: Experiments performed, data collected and analyzed encompassing:
kinematics, dynamics, energy, work, momentum, and their conservation concepts and
rotational motion and extended body problems.
Class Schedule: Two 180 minute lab classes per week; two hour final exam during last
scheduled lab session.
Contribution of Course to Professional Component: Together with PHYS 215, this
course sets the foundation for undergraduate physics and engineering curriculum.
Students perform experiments which illustrate basic physics concepts.
Relationship of Course to Program Outcomes: This course teaches students to:
Design and conduct experiments and analyze and interpret data (Program Outcome b).
Prepared by: Ms. Christine Pennise and Dr. Stephen Pate, Spring 2006.
123
Syllabus, Physics 216, Engineering Physics II, 3 credits
Designation: Required for Engineering Physics majors.
Course Description: Calculus-level treatment of topics in electricity, magnetism, and
optics.
Prerequisite: MATH 192 and PHYS 215.
Required Text: Randall Knight, Physics for Scientists and Engineers, Pearson Addison
st
Wesley, 1 Edition.
Class Web Pages: A class webpage with the syllabus and other information maintained at
http://physics.nmsu.edu/~jurquidi/
Course Objectives: Students should become proficient in the topics on electricity,
magnetism, and optics presented as well as connecting the concepts presented and their
use in engineering applications.
Topics Covered: The Electric Field; Electric Potential; Electrostatic Energy and
Capacitance; Electric Current and Direct Current Circuits; The Magnetic Field; Magnetic
Induction; Alternating Current Circuits; Maxwell’s Equations; Properties of Light;
Optical Images.
Class Schedule: Three 50 minute classes or two 75 minute classes per week; two hour
final exam during exam week.
Contribution of Course to Professional Component: Along with Phys 215, this course
sets the foundation for the undergraduate physics curriculum. Students learn the basic
concepts of electromagnetism and optics, how to apply them, and how to solve
physical problems. The course provides three credits of physics.
Relationship of Course to Program Outcomes: This course teaches students
to: Apply knowledge of math, science and engineering (Program Outcome a).
Prepared by Dr. Jacob Urquidi and Dr. Stephen Pate, Spring 2006.
124
Syllabus, Physics 216L, Engineering Physics I Laboratory, 1 credit
Designation: Required for most undergraduate Engineering majors. Engineering physics
majors may use this as an alternative for Physics 214L.
Course Description: Elementary laboratory in physics principles which supports the
subject matter in PHYS 216.
Co requisite: PHYS 216.
Required Text: McDermott, Shaffer, et al., Tutorials in Introductory Physics, Prentice
Hall, First Edition. Additional materials will be provided as needed.
Class Web Pages: A class webpage with the syllabus and other information is maintained
at http://physics.nmsu.edu/classes/labs/physics216/physics216l.html
Course Objectives: Students perform a series of experiments which apply the principles
and concepts highlighting the main objectives covered in the coursework for PHYS 216.
Topics Covered: Experiments performed, data collected and analyzed encompassing:
electrostatics, electric circuits, magnetism, electromagnetism and light, including
geometrical and physical optics.
Class Schedule: Two 180 minute lab classes per week; two hour final exam during last
scheduled lab session.
Contribution of Course to Professional Component: Together with PHYS 216, this
course sets the foundation for undergraduate physics and engineering curriculum.
Students perform experiments which illustrate basic physics concepts.
Relationship of Course to Program Outcomes: This course teaches students to:
Design and conduct experiments and analyze and interpret data (Program Outcome b).
Prepared by: Ms. Christine Pennise and Dr. Stephen Pate, Spring 2006.
125
Syllabus, Physics 217, Heat, Light and Sound, 3 credits
Designation: Required for Physics, and Engineering Physics.
Course Description: Calculus-level treatment of thermodynamics, geometrical and
physical optics, and sound.
Prerequisite: Physics 213 or PHYS 215.
Required Text: Randall Knight, Physics for Scientists and Engineers, Pearson Addison
Wesley, 1st Edition.
Class Web Pages: A class webpage with the syllabus and other information is
maintained at http://physics.nmsu.edu/~bkiefer/teaching/phys217.
Course Objectives: Students should become familiar with the concepts of waves, wave
propagation, and the description of these phenomena and how these concepts can be
generalized to give insight into optical processes. The section on thermodynamics in the
course discusses the laws of thermodynamics and their use to describe thermal processes
in engineering applications.
Topics Covered: Oscillations, wave motion, superposition of standing waves.
Temperature scales and the kinetic theory of gases, the 0th, 1st, and 2nd law of
thermodynamics, and thermal properties and processes. Properties of light, speed of light,
optical images, interference and diffraction.
Class Schedule: Three 50 minute classes or two 75 minute classes per week; two hour
final exam during exam week.
Contribution of Course to Professional Component: This course provides an overview of
the description of wave and basic wave phenomena that form the basis for the advanced
classes in engineering in optics and thermodynamics.
Relationship of Course to Program Outcomes: This course teaches students to:
Apply knowledge of math, science and engineering (Program Outcome a).
Prepared by Drs. Boris Kiefer and Stephen Pate, Spring 2006.
126
Syllabus, Physics 217L, Experimental Heat, Light and Sound, 3 credits
Designation: Required for Physics, and Engineering Physics.
Course Description: Laboratory experiments associated with the material presented in
PHYS 217.
Co requisite: Physics 217.
Required Text: Lab manual that was developed in the Department of Physics for this
course.
Class Web Pages: A class webpage with the syllabus and other information is
maintained at http://physics.nmsu.edu/~bkiefer/teaching/phys217.
Course Objectives: Students should become familiar with the experimental exploration
of basic phenomena in nature, data analysis, and the preparation of laboratory reports.
Topics Covered: Experimentation with waves, wave propagation, light, optical images,
interference and diffraction as well as thermodynamic properties of materials. This also
encompasses error analysis.
Class Schedule: One 3 hour laboratory per week.
Contribution of Course to Professional Component: This course provides students with
laboratory experiences that encompass the set up of experiments and working in teams.
Relationship of Course to Program Outcomes: This course teaches students to:
Design and conduct experiments, as well as to analyze and interpret data (Program
Outcome b).
Prepared by Drs. Boris Kiefer and Stephen Pate, Spring 2006.
127
Syllabus, Physics 315: Modern Physics, 3 credits
Designation: Required for Engineering Physics majors.
Course Description: An introduction to relativity and quantum mechanics, with
applications to atoms, molecules, solids, nuclei, and elementary particles.
Prerequisite: Mathematics 291, Physics 214; or equivalent.
Co requisite: Physics 315L.
Required Text: Serway, Moses, and Moyer, Modern Physics, 2nd ed. (1997).
Class Web Pages: A class webpage with the syllabus and other information is maintained
at http://zeppo.nmsu.edu/pvs/teaching/phys315/.
Course Objectives: Students should become familiar with the principles and basic
equations of the special theory of relativity and quantum mechanics and their applications
in simple problems in various fields of physics.
Topics Covered: Special relativity; quantum theory of light; atomic structure of matter;
matter waves and wave-particle duality; the Schrodinger equation in one and three
dimensions; quantum tunneling; atomic structure and the periodic table; quantum
statistics; and selected applications in molecular, solid state, nuclear, and/or particle
physics.
Class Schedule: Three 50-minute classes or two 75-minute classes per week; two-hour
final-exam during exam week.
Contribution of Course to Professional Component: This course provides the foundations
for upper-division physics core courses; in particular, Physics 454-455 and Physics 480.
The course provides three credits of physics.
Relationship of Course to Program Outcomes: This course teaches students to: Apply
knowledge of math, science, and engineering (Program Outcome a); an understanding of
professional and ethical responsibility (Program Outcome f); an understanding of the
impact of engineering solutions in the societal context (Program Outcome h); a
recognition for life-long learning (Program Outcome i); a knowledge of contemporary
issues (Program Outcome j).
Prepared by Drs. Vassili Papavassiliou and Stephen Pate, Spring 2006.
128
Syllabus, Physics 315L, Experimental Modern Physics, 2 credits
Designation: Required for Physics and Engineering Physics majors.
Course Description: Elementary laboratory in modern physics which supports the
subject matter in PHYS 315.
Co requisite: PHYS 315.
Required Text: Experiment write ups and supplementary reading materials will be
provided by the instructor.
Class Web Pages: A class webpage with the syllabus and other information maintained
at http://top.nmsu.edu/315L/.
Course Objectives: Students perform a series of classic experiments in quantum physics
and apply techniques of measurement, interpretation, and presentation of experimental
data.
Topics Covered: Error analysis and statistics; Quantization of Charge, Energy, and Mass;
the Wave Nature of Matter; the Speed of Light; selected topics in Atomic, Condensed
Matter, Nuclear and Particle Physics.
Class Schedule: Two 150 minute classes per week.
Contribution of Course to Professional Component: Together with Phys 315, this course
is a fundamental part of the introductory physics course sequence. Students perform
experiments which illustrate quantum effects in nature, learn the basic concepts of error
analysis, and present their results in written reports and orally. The course provides two
credits of engineering physics.
Relationship of Course to Program Outcomes: This course teaches students to: Design
and conduct experiments, as well as analyze and interpret data (Program Outcome b);
function on multidisciplinary teams (Program Outcome d); understand professional and
ethical responsibility (Program Outcome f);communicate effectively (Program Outcome
g); use techniques, skills and modern tools necessary for engineering practice (Program
Outcome k).
Prepared by Dr. Gary Kyle, Spring 2006.
129
Syllabus, Physics 451, Intermediate Mechanics I, 3 credits
Designation: Required for undergraduate Physics majors and Engineering Physics
majors.
Course Description: Vector calculus, Lagrangian and Hamiltonian formulations of
Newtonian mechanics. Topics include central force motion, dynamics of rockets and
space vehicles, rigid body motion, noninertial reference frames, oscillating systems,
relativistic mechanics, classical scattering, and fluid mechanics.
Prerequisite: Physics 213 or equivalent.
Required Text: Fowles and Cassiday, Analytical Mechanics, Brooks and Cole, 6th
Edition.
Class Web Pages: This course will use WebCT, http://salsa.nmsu.edu
Course Objectives: In this course you will develop a more comprehensive understanding
of the fundamental ideas underlying classical mechanics (Newton’s laws and
conservation laws). You will learn mathematical techniques for application of these
ideas to solving problems. You will also learn alternative formulations of these basic
principles (Lagrangian and Hamiltonian) based on the principle of least action and on the
calculus of variations.
Topics Covered: Vector calculus, Newton’s laws, special techniques for solving
Newton’s second law, Oscillations, noninertial reference systems, gravitation and orbital
dynamics, rigid-body mechanics, calculus of variations, Lagrangian mechanics, normal
coordinates.
Class Schedule: Three 50 minute classes or two 75 minute classes per week; two hour
final exam during exam week.
Contribution of Course to Professional Component: This course sets the foundation for
undergraduate physics and engineering curriculum. Students learn basic physics
mechanics concepts, how to apply them, and how to solve physical problems. The course
provides three credits of physics.
Relationship of Course to Program Outcomes: This course teaches students to:
Identify, formulate and solve engineering and physics problems (Program Outcome e).
Prepared by Drs. Stephen Kanim and Stephen Pate, Spring 2006.
130
Syllabus Physics 454 Intermediate Modern Physics I
Designation: Required for Physics and Engineering Physics majors.
Course Description: This is the first part of a two-semester course in Intermediate
Modern Physics. The course will review the fundamental concepts of quantum physics
and apply the principles of quantum mechanics to atoms, molecules, solids, and nuclei.
This course is intended for senior undergraduate and first-year graduate students.
Prerequisite: Math 392 and Physics 315.
Required Text: J.S. Townsend, A Modern Approach to Quantum Mechanics, University
Science Books, 2000.
Class Web Pages: A class webpage with the syllabus and other information is maintained
at http://top.nmsu.edu/454/ .
Course Objectives: Students should become proficient in solving a wider range of
physical problems related to quantum mechanics and its applications.
Topics Covered: Schrödinger equation, selection rules, atomic and molecular spectra,
quantum statistics, electrical conductivity, magnetism, phonons, collisions and scattering,
nuclear models and reactions, radioactivity, and elementary particles.
Class Schedule: Three 50 minute or two 75 minute classes per week: two-hour final
examination during exam week.
Contribution of the Course to Professional Component: The course provides an in-depth
study of quantum mechanics. It constitutes an integral part of the upper-division physics
core classes, which include Physics 451, 454-455, and 461-462.
Relationship of Course to Program Outcomes:
This course teaches students to:
Identify, formulate, and solve engineering problems (Program Outcome e).
Prepared by Dr. Gary Kyle, Fall 2005
131
Physics 455: Intermediate Modern Physics II, 3 credits
Designation: Required for Engineering Physics majors.
Course Description: Continuation of topics in PHYS 454.
Prerequisite: Phys 454
Required Text: J. S. Townsend, A Modern Approach to Quantum Mechanics, University
Science Books, 2000.
Class Web Pages: A class webpage with the syllabus and other information is maintained
at http://physics.nmsu.edu/~bkiefer/455/2006.
Course Objectives: Students should become proficient in solving a wide range of
physical problems related to quantum mechanics and its applications.
Topics Covered: Schrödinger equation, selection rules, atomic and molecular spectra,
quantum statistics, electrical conductivity, magnetism, phonons, collisions and scattering,
nuclear models and reactions, radioactivity, and elementary particles.
Class Schedule: Three 50 minute classes or two 75 minute classes per week; two hour
final exam during exam week.
Contribution of Course to Professional Component: The course provides an in-depth
study of quantum mechanics. It constitutes an integral part of the upper-division physics
core classes, which include Physics 451, 454-455, and 461-462.
Relationship of Course to Program Outcomes:
Identify, formulate, and solve engineering problems (Program Outcome e).
Prepared by Dr. Boris Kiefer, Spring 2006.
132
Syllabus, Physics 461, Intermediate Electricity and Magnetism I, 3 credits
Designation: Required for Physics and Engineering Physics majors.
Course Description: Electro- and magnetostatics, dielectric and magnetic materials,
electric and magnetic fields in matter.
Prerequisite: Physics 214 or 216 or equivalent.
Required Text: D.J. Griffith, Introduction to Electrodynamics, 3rd edition, Prentice Hall,
1999.
Course Objectives: Students should become proficient in a wide range of problems
regarding electro- & magnetostatics and electric & magnetic fields.
Topics Covered: vector analysis, including vector algebra and vector fields, differential
and integral calculus, curvilinear coordinates, Dirac delta function; electrostatics,
including electric field, electric potential, work and energy in electrostatics; special
techniques, including Laplace’s equation, method of images, multipole expansion;
electric fields, including polarization, electric displacements, linear dielectrics;
magnetostatics, including Lorentz force, Biot-Savart law, magnetic vector potential;
magnetic fields in matter, including magnetization, magnetic susceptibility, magnetic
ordering.
Class Schedule: Two 75-minute classes per week; two-hour final exam during exam
week.
Contribution of Course to Professional Component: This course provides the
fundamental knowledge of electro- and magnetostatics, and related phenomena. It
constitutes an integral part of the upper-division physics core, which includes Physics
451, 454&455 and 461&462.
Relationship of Course to Program Outcomes: The student will acquire an ability to:
Identify, formulate and solve engineering problems (Program Outcome e).
Prepared by Dr. Heinrich Nakotte, Spring 2006.
133
Syllabus, Physics 462, Intermediate Electricity and Magnetism II, 3 credits
Designation: Required for Physics and Engineering Physics majors.
Course Description: Electromagnetic wave propagation, reflection, refraction,
waveguides, radiating systems, interference and diffraction, Newtonian and relativistic
electrodynamics
Prerequisite: Physics 461 or equivalent
rd
Required Text: D.J. Griffith, Introduction to Electrodynamics, 3 edition, Prentice Hall,
1999.
Course Objectives: Students should become proficient in a wide range of problems
regarding electromagnetic wave propagation.
Topics Covered: electromotive force, induction, Maxwell’s equations, conservation
laws, electromagnetic waves in vacuum and in matter, absorption and dispersion,
waveguides, dipole radiation, relativistic electrodynamics
Class Schedule: Two 75-minute classes per week; two-hour final exam during exam
week.
Contribution of Course to Professional Component: This course provides the
fundamental knowledge of electrodynamics and related phenomena. It constitutes an
integral part of the upper-division physics core, which includes Physics 451, 454&455
and 461&462.
Relationship of Course to Program Outcomes: This course teaches students to:
Identify, formulate, and solve engineering problems (Program Outcome e).
Prepared by Dr. Heinrich Nakotte & Dr. Igor Vasiliev, Spring 2006.
134
Syllabus, Physics 471, Modern Experimental Optics, 2 credits
Designation: Laboratory course to accompany Phys 470
Course Description: Covers advanced laboratory experiments in optics related to the
material in Physics 470. This course is cross-listed as EE 481.
Prerequisite: Physics 470 or concurrent enrollment.
Reading Material: Laboratory experimental write-ups provided, Phys 470 text used as
reference.
Course Objectives: Students should become familiar with the concepts of electromagnetic
wave phenomena including polarization, interference, diffraction (both near-and-far
field), and interference and diffraction grating spectroscopy. Graded laboratory reports
measure student understanding of experimental concepts and results.
Topics Covered: Polarization and birefringence, Brewster’s angle, Mach-Zender
interferometer, diffraction grating spectroscopy, near-and far-field diffraction patterns,
multiple beam interference, Fabry-Perot interferometer.
Class Schedule: Two two-and-one-half -hour laboratory periods per week.
Contribution of Course to Professional Component: This course provides laboratory
experience in optics, an area of great significance in modern optical science and
engineering. In particular, knowledge and skills learned in this course may be exploited
by the students in the culminating capstone design project at the end of their studies.
The course provides two credits of physics.
Relationship of course to Program Outcomes: This course teaches students to:
Design and conduct experiments, as well as analyze and interpret data (Program Outcome
b); function on multidisciplinary teams (Program Outcome d); understand professional
and ethical responsibility (Program Outcome f); communicate effectively (Program
Outcome g); use techniques, skills and modern tools necessary for engineering practice
(Program Outcome k).
Prepared by Drs. R. Armstrong and Stephen Pate, Spring 2006.
135
Syllabus, Physics 475: Advanced Physics Laboratory, 2 credits
Designation: Required for Engineering Physics majors.
Course Description: Advanced undergraduate laboratory involving experiments in
atomic, molecular, nuclear, and condensed-matter physics.
Prerequisite: Physics 315 and Physics 315L.
Required Text: None.
Class Web Pages: A class webpage with the syllabus and other information is maintained
at http://zeppo.nmsu.edu/pvs/teaching/phys475/.
Course Objectives: Students should perform a series of experiments which highlight
basic experimental and statistical-analysis techniques that are being used in contemporary
scientific research, and present the results in publication-quality form.
Topics Covered: Experimental measurements, error propagation, and statistical analysis;
scanning tunneling microscopy; nanomaterials; radiation detectors; radioactive decay law
and lifetimes.
Class Schedule: Two 150-minute classes per week.
Contribution of Course to Professional Component: This course is an important
component of the students’ training in science. The students perform experiments which
sample a cross section of experimental techniques used in research in various subfields of
physics and learn to perform a rigorous data analysis and to prepare a professional
presentation of the results. The course provides two credits of physics.
Relationship of Course to Program Outcomes: This course teaches students to: Design
and conduct experiments, as well as analyze and interpret data (Program Outcome b);
function on multidisciplinary teams (Program Outcome d); understand professional and
ethical responsibility (Program Outcome f); communicate effectively (Program Outcome
g); use techniques, skills and modern tools necessary for engineering practice (Program
Outcome k).
Prepared by Drs. Vassili Papavassiliou and Stephen Pate, Spring 2006.
136
Syllabus, Physics 476: Computational Physics, 3 credits
Designation: Required for Physics majors with an emphasis on computational physics.
Course Description: An introduction to finite difference methods, Fourier expansions,
Fourier integrals, solution of differential equations, Monte Carlo calculations, and
application to advanced physics problems.
Prerequisite: MATH 392.
Required Text: W. R. Gibbs, Computation in Modern Physics, World Scientific
Class Web Pages: None.
Course Objectives: Students should become proficient in the higher level methods of
treating
physics problems with a computer.
Topics Covered: Classical integration techniques (trapezoidal and Simpson’s rules,
Gauss-Legendre and Gauss-Laguerre integration, principal-value integrals), Monte Carlo
techniques (sampling, evaluation of multi-dimensional integrals, radiation transport),
Differential equations(classical motion, molecular dynamics),Computer architecture for
Scientists, Systems of equations(linear algebra, elimination and eigen value techniques),
Finite element methods in one and two Dimensions, Signal processing, Chaotic systems
(Feigenbaum’s numbers).
Class Schedule: Three 50 minute classes per week and a two-hour final exam during
exam week.
Contribution of Course to Professional Component: The course provides an in-depth
study of computational physics. It provides 3 credits of physics.
Relationship of Course to Program Outcomes: This course teaches students to:
Design a system, component, or process to meet desired needs within realistic constraints
such as economic, environmental, social, political, ethical, health and safety,
manufacturability, and sustainability (Program Outcome c); use the techniques, skills and
engineering tools necessary for engineering practice (Program Outcome k).
Prepared by Drs. William R. Gibbs and Stephen Pate, Spring 2006.
137
Syllabus, Physics 480, Thermodynamics, 3 credits
Designation: Required for Engineering Physics majors in the ECE option.
Course Description: Thermodynamics and statistical mechanics. Basic concepts of
temperature, heat, entropy, equilibrium, reversible and irreversible processes.
Applications to solids, liquids, and gases.
Prerequisite: PHYS 217, PHYS 315, and MATH 291.
Required Text: Kittel and Kroemer, Thermal Physics (2nd Edition), Freeman.
Class Web Pages: A class webpage with the syllabus and other information maintained at
http://physics.nmsu.edu/~pate/teaching/phys480.
Course Objectives: Phys 480 is an introduction to thermodynamics and statistical
physics. The material is taught from the point of view of quantum mechanics from the
very beginning, but the knowledge of quantum mechanics required of the student is in
fact very slight. We will cover the fundamental topics of equilibrium thermodynamics --
entropy, temperature, energy, heat, reversible and irreversible processes -- and see
applications to some simple systems.
Topics Covered: Thermodynamics and statistical mechanics. Basic concepts of
temperature, heat, entropy, equilibrium, reversible and irreversible processes.
Applications to solids, liquids, and gases.
Class Schedule: Three 50 minute classes or two 75 minute classes per week; two hour
final exam during exam week.
Contribution of Course to Professional Component: Statistical mechanics and
thermodynamics are central to many applications of physics in the real world, and their
use crosses many conceptual boundaries in physics and engineering. Students proficient
in the concepts covered in this course will excel in their study of complex systems. The
course provides three credits of physics.
Relationship of Course to Program Outcomes: This course teaches students to: Identify,
formulate and solve engineering problems (Program Outcome e).
Prepared by Dr. Stephen Pate, Spring 2006.
138
Syllabus, Physics 488, Condensed Matter Physics, 3 credits
Designation: Physics elective for Engineering Physics majors.
Course Description: Crystal structure, X-ray diffraction, energy band theory, phonons,
cohesive energy, conductivities, specific heats, p-n junctions, defects, surfaces, and
magnetic, optical and low-temperature properties.
Prerequisite: Physics 454.
Required Text: N. W. Ashcroft and N. D. Mermin, Solid State Physics, Thomson
Publishing, 1976.
Class Web Pages: A class webpage with the syllabus and other information is maintained
at http://loki.nmsu.edu/Phys488 .
Course Objectives: Students should become proficient in solving a wide range of
physical problems related to the mechanical, electronic, and optical properties of solid
materials.
Topics Covered: Crystal structure, wave phenomena in periodic media, free electron
theory of metals, physics of semiconductors, and band theory of solids.
Class Schedule: Three 50 minute classes or two 75 minute classes per week; two hour
final exam during exam week.
Contribution of Course to Professional Component: The course provides an in-depth
review of solid state theory and covers engineering-physics concepts that help to develop
an understanding of the structure and physical nature of modern materials.
Relationship of Course to Program Outcomes: This course teaches students: This course
teaches students to: An understanding of professional and ethical responsibility (Program
Outcome f); an understanding of the impact of engineering solutions in the societal
context (Program Outcome h); A recognition for life-long learning (Program Outcome i);
a knowledge of contemporary issues (Program Outcome j).
Prepared by Drs. Igor Vasiliev and Stephen Pate, Spring 2006.
139
Syllabus, Physics 489, Introduction to Modern Materials, 3 credits
Designation: Physics elective for Engineering Physics majors.
Course Description: Structure and mechanical, thermal, electrical and magnetic
properties of modern materials; modern experimental techniques for the study of material
properties.
Prerequisite: Physics 315, Modern Physics.
Suggested Texts: Philip Ball, Made to Measure - New Materials f


Use: 0.3777