• An Introduction to Assessment


  •   
  • FileName: intro_to_assessment.pdf [preview-online]
    • Abstract: HE Academy HE in FE Teaching and Learning: Introduction to Assessment ... to Assessment. Page 3 of 30. Introduction to Assessment. This introduction to the Good Practice Guide for HE in FE relates to Assessment. for those ...

Download the ebook

An Introduction to Assessment 
The Higher Education Academy ­ HE in FE: Teaching and Learning 
Written and prepared by Gary Hargreaves ­ EIAT Consultancy Ltd 
December 2006
An Introduction to Assessment 
The Higher Education Academy ­ HE in FE: Teaching and Learning 
Written and prepared by Gary Hargreaves ­ EIAT Consultancy Ltd 
Introduction to Assessment ............................................................. 3 
Aims ..................................................................................................................3 
Methodology......................................................................................................3 
HE Provision in Further Education.................................................. 4 
Perceptions of Assessment ............................................................. 6 
Assessment in General .....................................................................................6 
Issues with HE in FE .........................................................................................7 
The HE Environment .........................................................................................8 
Assessment in FE .............................................................................................9 
Assuring the Quality of Assessment............................................. 10 
QAA Code of Practice Section 6: Assessment of Students .............................10 
Types of Assessment...................................................................... 11 
Diagnostic, Formative and Summative Assessment .......................................11 
The Decline in Formative Assessment ............................................................12 
Assessment for Student Learning................................................. 13 
Conditions for Learning include .......................................................................13 
Designing Assessment ................................................................... 15 
The Language of Assessment.........................................................................15 
Diversity in Assessment ..................................................................................15 
Innovation and Creativity in Assessment.........................................................16 
Assessing Process or Product – The Tingle Factor.........................................16 
Feedback in Assessment ................................................................................20 
Mind your language! ........................................................................................21 
Managing Assessment.................................................................... 22 
Pre­Assessment Issues...................................................................................22 
Plagiarism......................................................................................... 24 
Concluding Commentary................................................................ 26 
Recommendations and next steps ..................................................................28 
Acknowledgements ......................................................................... 29 
Concluding remarks......................................................................................29 
Selective Bibliography .................................................................... 30
HE Academy ­ HE in FE Teaching and Learning: Introduction to Assessment  Page 2 of 30 
Introduction to Assessment 
This introduction to the Good Practice Guide for HE in FE relates to Assessment 
for those who are:
· providing guidance
· delivering assessment strategies
· being assessed 
The  content  reflects  current  advice,  trends,  issues  and  innovations  in 
Assessment,  and  gives  an  indication  of  the  range  and  diversity  in  assessment 
practices  and  assessment  materials.  The  introduction  contains  references  and 
examples, or links to sample materials as a reflection of what already exists and 
of work that is currently in development, including experimental practices. 
This introduction is not meant to be a definitive guide. It poses further questions 
and relates  to requirements  that range from  a  local subject specific  level  to  the 
wider  quality  assurance  context.  It  attempts  also  to  refer  to  common  reference 
points set out by agencies such as awarding bodies  and the  Quality Assurance 
Agency for Higher  Education  (QAA).   This introduction  provides a starting  point 
for the further sharing of ideas and good practice. It is hoped that it will contribute 
to the development and enhancement of assessment and assessment practices 
for Higher Education provision within FE institutions and associated providers. 
Aims
· To create an introduction to assessment in a format that can be used for 
both web and printed media
· To identify models and examples of good practice in assessment and to 
make examples and case studies available
· To provide a starting point for further exploration and dissemination of 
work 
Methodology 
The process of developing this introduction has included:
· making use of existing research and developing research to identify 
examples of good practice
· working with practitioners, teachers, assessors and other relevant parties 
to establish, identify and source examples of good practice
· linking to other relevant work within the larger HE Academy frame
· collecting and analysing assessment materials
· organising and attending meetings with relevant providers
· exploring ideas through workshops and other forums attended by relevant 
practitioners and other stakeholders
HE Academy ­ HE in FE Teaching and Learning: Introduction to Assessment  Page 3 of 30 
HE Provision in Further Education 
In Further Education, demands from funding  bodies, external quality assurance, 
government  initiatives  and  changing  priorities  have  increased  the  tension 
between  accountability  and  the  need  to  achieve  high  standards.  This  is  not 
unique to FE but has resonances with colleagues in HEIs who have traditionally 
sought  to  protect  and  control  their  and  ownership  of  quality  assurance  and 
academic  standards.  However,  still,  and  too  often,  is  external  audit  seen  as 
another layer of inspection despite assurances to provide ‘peer review’. 
Assessment  and  the  results  of  assessment  often  becomes  the  first  focus  for 
qualitative evaluation. 
The  provision  of  Higher  Education  programmes  of  study  in  Further  Education 
institutions has many differences from that of other Higher Education institutions 
(HEIs).  These  differences  often  arise  from  a  particularity  of  geographic, 
economic, industrial, or ecological history which meets the needs of communities 
that are as diverse as the physical environments where they exist. 
The  tradition  of  Higher  Education  courses  in  colleges  is  not  new.  For  example 
professional  vocational  qualifications  similar  to  the  current  Higher  National 
Diplomas have been around in one form or another since the 1920s and became 
strengthened in the 1950s and 1960s by the dual demands of employers and a 
workforce  eager  to improve  their  employment prospects. Further  Education has 
seen  and coped  with  significant changes  through  the years, and  the sector has 
had  to  be  both  reactive  and  proactive  as  learners  and  potential  learners 
progressed through a college education that often saw individuals begin at level 1 
and continue through to level 3 and beyond. Students wanted to stay on, as they 
responded  favourably  to  the  FE  environment,  and  the  experiences  that  were 
offered  included  convenience  and  locality  with  the  ability  to  respond  to  the 
demands  of  workplace  and  prospects  of  increased  employability.  Colleges 
responded  to  this  demand  by  working  to  provide  a  range  of  appropriate  higher 
level  courses  appropriately  resourced  “The  environment  is  an  essential  part  of 
the  Confetti  experience.  The  building  has  been  designed  to  help  people  work, 
communicate, create and learn.” 1 
It  is,  then,  no  accident  that  systems  and  protocols  and  approaches  to  delivery 
and  assessment,  already  available  in  FE  were  adopted  by  teachers  as  HE 
programmes became available in colleges. Well defined mechanisms and quality 
systems  were  required  as  provision  expanded  to  reflect  employ  needs.    The 
introduction of robust internal moderation and verification protocols added rigour 
and equity across programmes and delivery since programmes were often taught 
by  employers  or  professional  practitioners  who  needed  clear  guidance  on 
delivering  higher  level  vocational  awards.  Bury  College  appointed  their  first 
Quality  Manager  in  1991,  at  a  time  when  Quality  Assurance  was  seen  by 
lecturing  staff  as  an  unwelcome  input  from  USA  and  the  devil’s  work.    Quality 

Confetti Insitute website/ prospectus http://www.confettistudios.com/index_ok2.php
HE Academy ­ HE in FE Teaching and Learning: Introduction to Assessment  Page 4 of 30 
Assurance,  whatever  the  pedigree,  was  to  become  a  necessary  evil  as  there 
were some instances when lecturers would be delivering National Diplomas or A 
Levels in the morning and HND provision in the afternoon. Occasionally, existing 
assignments,  originally  developed for level  3  study were  modified for the  higher 
level  programmes.  Whilst  this  might  not  be  regarded  as  good  practice,  it  was 
often a pragmatic response that reflected the demands of an increased workload 
in teaching, coupled with the assessment and internal quality requirements in the 
FE sector. It was, in effect, a typical FE response to move quickly and respond to 
increasing  demand,  and  quickly.  The  ability  to  react  and  respond  quickly  has 
continued to be a positive aspect of HE in FE where traditionally HEIs have been 
somewhat slow  or  even  hesitant  to  respond  to  market  forces,  employment  and 
student demands. Co­operation, association and the development of HE centres 
in  partnerships  with  FE  has  changed  the  HE  landscape  and  brought 
improvements,  (like  improved  speed  of  curricular  development)  a  variation  to 
assessment practices to HE and FE that has been reciprocal.  Key components 
in the teaching landscape are practices and methodology of assessment. FE has 
had  a  significant  impact  on  the  development  of  assessment,  more  of  which  we 
shall explore later. The emphasis in FE has been vocational courses of study and 
this  was  mirrored  in  the  provision  for  taught  HE  programmes  within  the  same 
institutions. A significant shift was to move away from the demands of employers 
as  the  traditional  employment  and  manufacturing  base  declined  and  also  to 
respond more directly to the more sophisticated needs of students and learners. 
There  was  no  longer  the  same  demand  for  higher  level  qualifications  in  paper 
making  in  Bury,  Lancashire,  textile  manufacturing  in  Huddersfield,  Yorkshire  or 
shipbuilding  on  Teesside,  or  mining  in  Wales.  Significant  changes  in 
manufacturing  and  industry  coincided  with  incorporation  (1993)  as  colleges 
strived to be independent and competitive as the result of the Further and Higher 
Education  Act  1992.  As  result  of  incorporation,  cooperation  was  abandoned, 
innovation was stifled and the sharing of good practice was forbidden. 
Further education has largely reinvented itself, its either rebuilt or refurbished its 
premises  and  also  its  curricula.  Mid  Kent  college  in  Chatham  are  about  to 
transform the locality with an innovative new building at the Medway site that will 
share  the  innovation  already  adopted  by  the  Universities  of  Kent,  Christchurch 
and Greenwich, sharing a site and resources for the benefit of students and staff, 
employers  and  the  community.  HE  is  working  with  FE  together  “The  architects 
have taken a great deal of care to ensure the existing profile of the landscape is 
retained  and  much  of  the  development  will  be  glazed  to  give  a  sense  of  open 
space. The building will be naturally ventilated in as many areas a possible. It is 
planned that many of  the facilities such  as  the  theatre, cafes and holistic shops 
will be used by the community” 2 

http://www.kent.ac.uk/medway­project/MKC.htm
HE Academy ­ HE in FE Teaching and Learning: Introduction to Assessment  Page 5 of 30 
Perceptions of Assessment 
Around  100  staff  took  part  in  a  number  of  seminar  events  and  conferences  in 
2006, during which they were asked about HE in FE in relation to their particular 
circumstances.    Comments  and  viewpoints  were  collated  to  build  up  a  reliable 
audit of perceptions. 
Assessment in General 
The following two summaries outline the basic perceptions about assessment for 
those involved in the provision of HE within FE institutions and providers. 
What Assessment IS?  What Assessment IS NOT?
· A measure of student learning · Not concrete
· Compulsory · Not relevant to employer needs
· A distribution of marks · Not  true reflection of all skills 
· A worry for students gained
· Evaluative of a learner · Not always consistent
· Evaluative of a teacher /  · Not easy to define
instructor · Not used well
· Measurement · Not appropriate at times
· Mapping · Not fun
· Comparison · Not varied
· Grading · Not understood by staff, 
· Feedback (Formative and  students or management
Summative)
· A closed loop ­ aid to further 
learning
· Questioning techniques
· A ‘box ticking’ exercise
· Moderation and verification e.g. 
of ILOs
HE Academy ­ HE in FE Teaching and Learning: Introduction to Assessment  Page 6 of 30 
Assessment Negatives  Assessment Positives
· An obstacle · Sharing good practice
· Not consistent · Easy to understand
· Not always clear to students · Structured
· It isn’t competitive · Varied
· Can be scary · Planned
· Not always effective · Linking theory to practice
· Not informed by staff research &  · Monitoring process
scholarly activity · Constructive feedback
· Not always reliable · Everyone aware
· Not always recorded well · Review 
· Can be ‘destructive’ if done 
badly
· Can result in Universities 
withdrawing validation – or 
taking on the courses 
themselves
Issues with HE in FE 
It  was  significant  that,  during  the  seminars  and  events  in  2006,  the  focus  of 
discussions would move from the consideration of assessment to the differences 
between HE provision at an HEI compared to HE delivered within FE institutions. 
These  perceived  differences  were  considered  to  have  a  major  bearing  on  the 
nature and methods of assessment and the following points highlight some of the 
common  threads  of  thought.  Even  though  some  of  the  points  raised  by 
colleagues  and  managers  may  be  highly  subjective,  the  perceptions  may  be 
important in considering the HE in FE experience.
· HEIs are perceived as having superior resources.  FE is ‘delivered on a 
shoestring’
· HEIs and HE in FE are not perceived as equal.  FE is perceived as inferior
· HE in an HEI is more ‘grown up’; (for example the difference between 
Ofsted and QAA, or the LSC and HEFCE)
· FE is highly regulated
· Staff are not on comparable pay scales in the two environments; neither 
do they have similar conditions of service
· Staff resources for HE in FE may be limited or differently organised to the 
staff available in an HEI
HE Academy ­ HE in FE Teaching and Learning: Introduction to Assessment  Page 7 of 30 
· Delivery in an HEI is perceived as less vocational than HE in FE
· More course work skills are developed in HE in FE provision
· Academic support for HE in FE is considered to tend toward ‘spoon­ 
feeding’
· HE in FE provision tends to be smaller but more intense
· HE in FE provides a unique progression pathway, within the same 
institution
· HE in FE is thought to embed learning skills before content delivery
· HE in FE is thought to provide training which is fit for purpose and industry 
related
· Exams are thought to be more prevalent in HEIs
· Autonomous learning is thought to be more easily attainable or available in 
HEIs
· HE cohorts in FE tend to be smaller than cohorts in an HEI 
The HE Environment 
A  key  feature  of  ‘HE­ness’  was  considered  to  be  the  environment  in  which 
learning  and  teaching  was  taking  place.    This  was  perceived  to  have  a  major 
impact on the type of assessment that is appropriate, workable or even desirable 
in  some  institutions.    The  following  were  perceptions  drawn  from  many  staff 
across the HE in FE sector.
· HE students in FE were often more like FE students in the same institution
· HE was thought to have a stronger community
· FE was thought to be a more casual environment
· FE support mechanisms were thought to enhance HE students’ 
experience in FE
· HE in FE was thought to be less isolating for the student
· HE students in FE were more likely to live at home
· FE colleges struggle to create an effective HE environment
HE Academy ­ HE in FE Teaching and Learning: Introduction to Assessment  Page 8 of 30
‘HE­ness’ Negatives in FE  ‘HE­ness’ Positives in FE
· Lack of planned capital  · Empowering
allocation · Good employer links
· Lack of employment security · Supportive
· Vocational programmes often  · Responsive
delivered by part time staff · Flexible for learners
· No or little research base in  · High staff commitment
programmes or faculties · The future
· Invisibility within institution · Local provision
· Poverty of overall provision · Students have more support and 
· Poor or incomparable conditions  guidance in HE
of service · HE is more vocational 
· Research environment is less 
evident  than in traditional HEI
· “Kudos” of qualification greater 
from an HEI (employers and 
students)
· Not an obstacle
Assessment in FE 
During the perceptions audit, some particular issues and differences specific to 
assessment for HE provision in FE institutions were highlighted.
· Assessment schemes and rules for an awarding body in FE tend to be 
quite different from those set by an HEI
· The quality of feedback is different in FE compared to an HEI.  There is a 
consistent view that feedback in FE needs to be ‘more supportive’
· Internal verification & external verification or examination processes are 
different in FE compared to an HEI
· Staff teams in an HEI tend to be more focussed on particular programmes, 
which is unusual in FE 
It is clear that there are significant and positive aspects to the study of HE in an 
FE environment. However there are a number of perceptions that require fuller 
study to ascertain validity and to determine if they are at all relevant to the overall 
learning experience. A subject of enquiry that is worthy of wider and more 
detailed consideration can be given here.
HE Academy ­ HE in FE Teaching and Learning: Introduction to Assessment  Page 9 of 30 
Assuring the Quality of Assessment 
It is the responsibility of each institution to provide mechanisms and processes to 
ensure quality and standards. The external responsibility for quality assurance in 
colleges  is  with  the  Quality  Assurance  Agency  (QAA),  Ofsted/ALI.  Each  has 
different evaluative mechanisms that reflect a number of tensions, between that 
of the peer review (and the critical friend) and that of inspection. Processes range 
from  short  notice  and  immediate  response  and  judgements  to  a  good  deal  of 
notice and a lengthy review processes with delayed judgements. 
QAA  “has  responsibility  to  safeguard  the  public  interest  in  sound  standards  of 
higher education qualifications and to encourage continuous improvement in the 
management  of  the  quality  of  higher  education.”  3  QAA  supports  those 
responsible for delivering Higher Education programmes by providing a range of 
mechanisms  including  direct  review,  enhancement  and  a  range  of  publications. 
The  most  significant  publication  is  the  Code  of  Practice  for  the  Assurance  of 
Academic Quality and Standards in Higher Education. 
“Academic  quality  is  a  way  of  describing  how  well  the  learning  opportunities 
available  to  students help  them  to  achieve  their  award.  It  is  about  making  sure 
that  appropriate  and  effective  teaching,  support,  assessment  and  learning 
opportunities are provided for them.” 4 
QAA  Code  of Practice  outlines  in  10  sections  the precepts  for  what  is  seen  as 
good  practice in  Higher  Education.  “The Code of  practice assumes that,  taking 
into  account  principles  and  practices  agreed  UK­wide,  each  institution  has  its 
own systems for independent verification both of its quality and standards and of 
the effectiveness of its quality assurance systems.” 5 
Section  6  covers  Assessment  of  Students  in  the  revised  edition  of  the  Code  of 
Practice, published in September 2006. 
QAA Code of Practice Section 6: Assessment of Students 
The revised section of the code of practice places more emphasis on learning as 
part  of  assessment  processes.  “The  way  in  which  students  are  assessed 
fundamentally  affects  their  learning.  Good  assessment  practice  is  designed  to 
ensure  that,  in  order  to  pass  the  module  or  programme,  students  have  to 
demonstrate they have achieved the intended learning outcomes.” 6 
In this section of the Code of Practice, QAA state that assessment “describes any 
processes  that  appraise  an  individual's  knowledge,  understanding,  abilities  or 

The Quality Assurance Agency for Higher Education: an introduction ­ http://www.qaa.ac.uk/aboutus/qaaIntro/intro.asp 
also available in print 

Ibid. 

Ibid. 

QAA Code of Practice Section 6: Assessment of Students, para 13 (September 2006)
HE Academy ­ HE in FE Teaching and Learning: Introduction to Assessment  Page 10 of 30 
skills.  There  are  many  different  forms  of  assessment,  serving  a  variety  of 
purposes.  These include:
· promoting student learning by providing the student with feedback, 
normally to help improve his/her performance
· evaluating student knowledge, understanding, abilities or skills
· providing a mark or grade that enables a student's performance to be 
established. The mark or grade may also be used to make progress 
decisions
· enabling the public (including employers), and higher education providers, 
to know that an individual has attained an appropriate level of 
achievement that reflects the academic standards set by the awarding 
institution and agreed UK norms, including the frameworks for higher 
education qualifications. This may include demonstrating fitness to 
practise or meeting other professional requirements.” 7 
QAA  subscribes  to  a  convention  of  types  of  assessment  as  being  formative, 
summative and diagnostic and the combinations and variations of these can then 
be expanded into the most commonly used assessment methods.  The Code of 
Practice also includes other aspects related to assessment, such as:
· Recording, documenting and communication of assessment decisions
· ICT and assessment and its role in supporting assessment
· Assessment panels and examination boards
· Assessment regulations
· Appeals against assessment decisions
· External examining, internal verification and quality assurance 
Types of Assessment 
Diagnostic, Formative and Summative Assessment 
A variety of assessment is sought after by both assessors and students. The mix 
will  vary  and  be  dependent on the  intended learning  outcomes and  the  units or 
modules  in  each  programme.  It  is  clear  from  the  comments  from  a  range  of 
subject centres, specialist programmes and students that there is a fair degree of 
common ground and acceptance that assessments can be both imaginative and 

QAA Code of Practice Section 6: Assessment of Students, para 12 (September 2006)
HE Academy ­ HE in FE Teaching and Learning: Introduction to Assessment  Page 11 of 30 
responsive and provide both an evaluative and learning function.  HEFCE lists 47 
types  of  assessment  evidence  as  well  as  the  following  examples  of  commonly 
8
used assessment methods: 
· examination · practical
· case study · observation
· essay · group work
· reports · peer assessment
· posters · dissertations and projects
· role play · recap quiz
· applying understanding to a  · presentations
particular situation · vivas 
The Decline in Formative Assessment 
Whilst most institutions, including HEIs, have striven to provide a rich and varied 
approach  to  assessment,  there  is  still  a  widely  held  belief  that  summative 
assessment (and in particular, exams) provides the mainstay of all assessment. It 
may  be  that  exams  provide  a  very  useful  function,  particularly  with  the  rise  of 
student  numbers,  and  large  teaching  groups  and  the  necessity  to  provide 
equitable assessment that is both cost effective and qualitative. End of course, or 
programme  exams  resulted  in  a  marked  decline  in  formative  assessment.  With 
an  increased  concern  about  the  integrity  of  continually  assessed  course  work, 
and a rising tide of lobbyists claiming ‘plagiarism’ combined with the necessity to 
combat cheating,  although well intentioned it may well be misguided, and lead to 
a  decline  in  the  variety  of  assessment  tools  available  and,  in  particular,  to  the 
decline in formative assessment. 
“A  traditional  characteristic  of  teaching  in  higher  education  in  the  UK  has  been 
the  frequent  provision  of  detailed  personalized  feedback  on  assignments.  The 
archetype has been that of Oxford or Cambridge University where students wrote 
an  essay  a  week  and  read  it  out  to  their  tutor  in  a  one­to­one  tutorial,  gaining 
immediate and detailed oral feedback on their understanding as revealed in the 
essay. This was almost the only teaching many Oxbridge students experienced: 
teaching meant giving feedback on essays. This formative assessment was quite 
separate  from  marking  and  at  Oxford  and  Cambridge  the  only  summative 
assessment  often  consisted  of  final  examinations  at  the  end  of  three  years  of 
study that had involved weekly formative assessment.” [sic]  9  Gibbs and Simpson 
(2004)  present  a  formidable  research  paper  that  is  well  worth  reading  in  its 
entirety. 

HEFCE 2003.Supporting Higher Education in Further Education Colleges: A Guide for Tutors and Lecturers. Download 
from www.hefce.ac.uk 

Gibbs & Simpson 2004 University of Gloucester, Learning and Teaching in Higher Education (LATHE) Issue 1, 2004­05 
eds. Gravestock & Mason O’Connor,  Conditions Under Which Assessment Supports Students’ Learning
HE Academy ­ HE in FE Teaching and Learning: Introduction to Assessment  Page 12 of 30 
Assessment for Student Learning 
Gibbs  and  Simpson  (2003)  make  the  assumption  that  “assessment  has  a 
10 
profound impact on how much effort students put into learning”  . This led to the 
articulation  of  a  set  of  eleven  ‘conditions  under  which  assessment  supports 
student learning’ 
Conditions for Learning include 
Student learning is best supported when the following conditions are met:
· Assessed tasks capture sufficient student time and effort
· These tasks distribute student effort evenly across topics and weeks
· These tasks engage students in productive learning activity
· Assessment communicates clear and high expectations to students
· Sufficient feedback is provided, frequently enough & in enough detail
· The feedback is provided quickly enough to be useful to students
· Feedback focuses on learning rather than on marks or the students
· Feedback is linked to the purpose of the assignment and to stated criteria
· Feedback is understandable to students, given their sophistication
· Feedback is received by students and attended to
· Feedback is acted upon by students to improve their work or their learning 
These  assessment  conditions  were  based  on  research  in  assessment  theories 
and case studies drawn from schools and HEIs. A striking feature of this study is 
the  overwhelming  importance  placed on the nature  and quality  of  feedback. Six 
of  the  11  conditions  refer  explicitly  to  feedback  and  issues  related  to  feedback 
frequently were raised as an important aspect of assessment  in workshops and 
focus groups throughout the project in 2006. 
Forbes & Spence  (1991)  reported on a  study of  assessment  on  an engineering 
course  at  Strathclyde  University.  “When  lecturers  stopped  marking  weekly 
problem  sheets  because  they  were  simply  too  busy,  students  did  indeed  stop 
tackling the problems, and their exam marks went down as a consequence. But 
when lecturers introduced periodic peer­assessment of the problem sheets — as 
a course requirement but without the marks contributing — students’ exam marks 
increased  dramatically  to  a  level  well  above  that  achieved  previously  when 
lecturers did the marking. What achieved the learning was the quality of student 
engagement in learning tasks, not teachers doing lots of marking. The trick when 
designing  assessment  regimes  is  to  generate  engagement  with  learning  tasks 
without generating piles of marking.” 11 
10 
ibid 
11 
ibid
HE Academy ­ HE in FE Teaching and Learning: Introduction to Assessment  Page 13 of 30 
The new section  6  in  QAA   code of  practice  recognises  that  assessment does, 
can  and  should  be  encouraged  to  support  student  learning  “Examples  of 
assessment that support student learning include:
· designing a 'feedback loop' into assessment tasks so that students can 
apply formative feedback (from staff or peers) to improve their 
performance in the next assessment
· setting assessment tasks such as extended assignments that involve 
students researching a topic and producing work based on their research
· the use of peer assessed activities during formal teaching sessions where 
students, either in pairs or groups, comment constructively on one 
another's work. This technique enables students to understand 
assessment criteria and deepens their learning in several ways, including: 
a  learning from the way others have approached an assessment task 
(structure, content, analysis) and 
b  learning through assessing someone else's work, which 
encourages them to evaluate and benchmark their own 
performance and to improve it. 
Peer assessed activities can be used in a variety of learning situations, 
including practical work and in large or small classes
· the use of self­reflective accounts, or other types of student self 
assessment
· involving, for example, employers, patients or clients in providing part of 
the feedback to students on their performance
· enabling students to experience a range of assessment methods that take 
account of individual learning needs and, where appropriate, encouraging 
them to reflect on and synthesise learning from different parts of their 
programme. In some circumstances, synoptic assessment may help to 
support these aims
· where oral examinations take place, ensuring that opportunities are 
available for a student to practise and receive constructive feedback, and 
that the practise and feedback are timed to enable students to refine their 


Use: 0.5852