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MAE Flying at
Princeton Airport
Undergraduate
Handbook
2006 - 2007
Mechanical and
MAE Model T Roadster Aerospace
Engineering
at Princeton University
DEPARTMENT OF
MECHANICAL AND AEROSPACE ENGINEERING
UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS
HANDBOOK
For the Academic Year 2006 - 2007
This booklet supersedes all others and applies to the Classes of 2009 and beyond.
This booklet describes the undergraduate academic program of the MAE
Department in more detail than that available in the Undergraduate
Announcement. It provides information both to prospective concentrators and
to undergraduates already enrolled in the Department. For specific course
descriptions see the Undergraduate Announcement or the Graduate School
Announcement as appropriate.
Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Department Web Site:
http://mae.princeton.edu
Chairman Philip Holmes 258-5128 [email protected]
D-218
Departmental Michael Littman 258-5198 [email protected]
Representative & D-202A
Associate Chair
Undergraduate Jo Ann Love 258-5169 [email protected]
Administrator D-230
Director of Graduate Luigi Martinelli 258-6652 [email protected]
Studies D-302C
Graduate Jessica O’Leary 258-4683 [email protected]
Administrator D-228
Department Maureen Hickey 258-5168 [email protected]
Manager D-214
Business Manager Jenny Kokini 258-5139 [email protected]
D-210
TABLE OF CONTENTS
I. OVERVIEW.............................................................................................................................................................1
II. REQUIREMENTS .................................................................................................................................................3
A. INTRODUCTORY COURSES ..................................................................................................................................3
B. UPPERCLASS COURSES ........................................................................................................................................4
C. DEPARTMENTAL COURSES..................................................................................................................................5
D. GENERAL INFORMATION.....................................................................................................................................7
III. RECOMMENDED SAMPLE CURRICULA ....................................................................................................9
A. COURSE DESCRIPTIONS.......................................................................................................................................9
B. STANDARD SOPHOMORE CURRICULUM ............................................................................................................13
C. MECHANICAL ENGINEERING ............................................................................................................................14
D. AEROSPACE ENGINEERING ...............................................................................................................................17
E. ENGINEERING PHYSICS PROGRAM ...................................................................................................................18
F. MATERIALS SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING PROGRAM ......................................................................................20
G. INTERDEPARTMENTAL PROGRAMS ..................................................................................................................23
IV. DEPARTMENTAL PRIZES .............................................................................................................................24
V. INDEPENDENT WORK AND PUBLISHED PAPERS ...................................................................................25
VI. POST-GRADUATION PLANS .........................................................................................................................30
VII. FACULTY RESEARCH INTERESTS ..........................................................................................................31
VIII. WHO TO SEE FOR MORE INFORMATION............................................................................................36
UPPERCLASS ADVISORS .........................................................................................................................................36
STUDENT DEPARTMENTAL COMMITTEE AND OTHER STUDENT COMMITTEES ....................................................38
INTERDEPARTMENTAL PROGRAMS .......................................................................................................................39
STUDY ABROAD...................................................................................................................... ................................40
APPENDIX I: REQUIREMENT SHEETS
AEROSPACE ENGINEERING
MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
AEROSPACE AND MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
THE DEPARTMENT OF MECHANICAL AND AEROSPACE
ENGINEERING
I. OVERVIEW
The Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering is concerned
with the engineering science and technologies associated with ground, air,
water, and space transportation, including control and dynamics of vehicles
and systems, energy conversion and use, environmental effects, fluids,
materials, and applied physics. To accommodate this breadth of interest, the
Department offers two programs of study: Mechanical Engineering and
Aerospace Engineering. Through careful planning and selection of technical
electives the requirements of both the Mechanical and Aerospace
Engineering programs may be satisfied simultaneously. (See the Department
Representative for further information). Departmental students may also
participate in the SEAS Engineering Physics Program, or other SEAS
certificate programs such as Engineering and Management Systems,
Engineering Biology, Applied and Computational Mathematics, Robotics
and Intelligent Systems, and Materials Science in Engineering.
Both the Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering programs draw on
courses in the underlying fundamental sciences and mathematics during the
first year and introductory engineering science courses during the second year.
Students are shown the creative application of knowledge for the solution of
technical problems. Various aspects of engineering design, the process of
devising a system to meet a need, are introduced to the student through the
laboratories in the second year and continue through the upperclass years.
Normally, during the third year all students take a two semester design
sequence and additional engineering science courses, performing analyses and
studying applications in the areas of energy, power systems, structures, and
the dynamics of machines and their control. The courses in design offered
during the third year, combined with further depth in engineering science,
enable students to undertake realistic design projects during their senior year.
The programs are designed to prepare the graduate for an engineering career
and the ability to grow professionally.
The Department recognizes that students have a wide variety of career
objectives. Some may intend to enter industry directly in an engineering
capacity, or to continue studies in the graduate school in engineering or
applied science. Others may wish to take an engineering program in
preparation for careers in business, law, or medicine. Sufficient flexibility is
provided within the undergraduate program in the Department to permit
meeting these and other varied objectives while acquiring a foundation in the
engineering disciplines and associated problem solving skills.
1
All Departmental students engage in independent projects, some as early as
the sophomore year but, most commonly, during the senior year. Independent
work is an important complement to formal course work, and affords students
the opportunity to collaborate closely with faculty and graduate students while
working on real engineering problems. Support for student projects is available
through the John Marshall II Memorial Prize, awarded annually to one or
more seniors to support their experimental projects, with preference given to
projects in aeronautics. Additionally, the Morgan W. McKinzie ’93 Senior
Thesis Fund provides financial support for independent work or senior thesis
with preference given to projects in aircraft design and propulsion. The
selection is based on proposals submitted by students in the fall of the senior
year for both awards. Excellence in independent work is recognized by the
Department through the Donald Janssen Dike Award for Excellence in
Undergraduate Research, and outstanding senior thesis is recognized through
the Morgan W. McKinzie ‘93 Senior Thesis Prize, both prizes are awarded on
Class Day.
Departmental requirements are described in Section II. Sample curricula
are presented in Section III. Titles of recent independent projects undertaken
by undergraduates in the Department appear in Section IV. Plans after
graduation for the last five classes are summarized in Section V and a brief
description of the faculty research interests is found in Section VI. Section VII
lists "Who to See" among the faculty and students to obtain additional
information.
2
II. REQUIREMENTS (See Individual Forms, Appendix I.)
Some of the requirements may be satisfied by advanced placement or by
equivalent courses. No courses taken to satisfy these requirements may be
taken on a pass/fail or audit basis. Students entering the Department are
expected to meet the requirements for the freshman year established by the
School of Engineering and Applied Science.
A. Introductory Courses (Sophomore Year)
The required introductory courses that are prerequisites for the
Departmental upperclass courses, normally completed by the end of the
sophomore year, are:
1. Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering
MAE 206 Introduction to Engineering Dynamics
MAE 221 Thermodynamics
MAE 222 Mechanics of Fluids
MAE 223 Modern Solid Mechanics 1
MAE 224 Integrated Laboratory
The Sophomore Laboratory provides experiments associated with
Thermodynamics (MAE 221), Mechanics of Fluids (MAE 222) and Electronics.
2. Mathematics
MAT 201/202 Multivariable Calculus and Linear Algebra
-or-
MAT 203/204 Advanced Multivariable Calculus and Linear Algebra
3. Computer Programming (School of Engineering & Applied Science
requirement)
All BSE students must take a course that satisfies the BSE computing
requirement. (Fall 2005: COS 126, CHE 201 and Spring 2006: COS
126)
For students who have not yet taken one of the courses that currently
satisfies the requirement (or do not have advanced placement in
Computer Science), the only computing course offered in academic year
2006 – 2007 will be COS 126.
1 CEE205 is an acceptable substitute for MAE 223 for those students interested in structures
3
B. Upperclass Courses (Junior and Senior Year).
To graduate, all Departmental students must satisfactorily complete the
following requirements:
1. Applications of Mathematics
Two courses are required for both Mechanical and Aerospace Engineers.
a. One of these must be a course in differential equations:
MAE 305 (MAT 301) Mathematics in Engineering I
b. The other course must be a course in matrix analysis and finite
element methods:
CEE 361 (MAE 325) Structural Analysis and Introduction to Finite
Element Methods
In addition, all Mechanical Engineers must take a mathematics elective
usually selected from the following list:
• MAE 306 (MAT 302) Mathematics in Engineering II (strongly
recommended for those planning graduate work in
engineering or applied science)
• ORF 245 Fundamentals of Engineering Statistics
• ORF 309 Probability and Stochastic Systems (MAT 309/ELE 380)
• COS 309 Fundamentals of Scientific Computing
• COS 341 Discrete Mathematics
• MAT 304 Introduction to Partial Differential Equations
• MAT 305 Mathematical Programming
• MAT 306 Introduction to Discrete Mathematics
• MAT 317 Complex Analysis with Applications
(Alternatives not on this list must be approved by the Departmental
Representative in advance).
4
C. Departmental Courses
A minimum of eight upper level Departmental courses are required.
These eight courses must be distributed in the following manner:
1. Engineering Science Courses - Five courses are required from Sections
(a) (b) and (c).
(a) Dynamics and Control
MAE 331 Aircraft Flight Dynamics 1
MAE 341 Space Flight1
MAE 344 Introduction to Bioengineering and Medical Devices
MAE 345 Robotics and Intelligent Systems
MAE 433 Automatic Control Systems 2
MAE 434 Modern Control
(b) Fluid Mechanics/Thermal Sciences
MAE 328 Energy for a Greenhouse-Constrained World
MAE 335 Fluid Dynamics 3
MAE 336 Viscous Flows or MAE 552 Viscous Flows and
Boundary Layers
MAE 423 Heat Transfer3
MAE 426 Rocket and Air-Breathing Propulsion Technology4
MAE 427 Mobile Power Plants 4
(c) Materials/Structures
MAE 324 Structure and Properties of Materials 5
MAE 325 Structural Analysis and Intro to Finite Element Methods 6
MAE 334 Materials Selection and Design 5
MSE 301 Materials Science and Engineering 5
CEE 362 Structural Dynamics and Earthquake Engineering
1 MAE 331 or 341 required for Aerospace Engineers.
2 MAE 433 required for Mechanical and Aerospace Engineers.
3 MAE 335 or 423 required for Mechanical Engineers. MAE 335 required for Aerospace
Engineers.
4 MAE 427 or 426 required for Aerospace Engineers.
5 MAE 324 or 334 or MSE 301 required for Mechanical and Aerospace Engineers.
6 MAE 325 required for Mechanical and Aerospace Engineers.
5
2. Engineering Design Courses - Three courses are required.
MAE 321 Engineering Design 1
MAE 322 Mechanical Design 2
MAE 332 Aircraft Design 3
MAE 342 Space System Design3
MAE 412 Microprocessors for Measurement and Control2
Note: Independent Work, Senior Project or Senior Thesis with design may
satisfy one of the three design requirements. These courses are:
MAE 339D, MAE 340D, MAE 440D and MAE 442D
3. Independent Work - All students are required to participate in a self-
directed research or engineering project. At least one semester of
independent work as applied science research or an engineering project
is required. This may be satisfied by a semester of independent work
(339 or 340). If approved by the Departmental representative, an
independent work project may satisfy a portion of the design requirement
(339D, 340D). 339 and 339D are offered in the fall, and 340 and 340D
are offered in the spring. A year-long senior project (440) or senior thesis
(442) or senior project with design (440D) or senior thesis with design
(442D) also meets this requirement. Students are strongly encouraged
to select the year-long project or thesis option. Senior projects are
intended for teams or groups while senior thesis is intended for
individuals. For senior project or thesis, work begins in the fall but
enrollment is only in spring term when a double grade is awarded.
Please note: If a student has selected to participate in a year-long project or
thesis and is enrolled in only three courses during the fall semester, it is
required that they will enroll in Senior Project or Thesis during the spring
semester. For these students, it will NOT be possible to drop-down to a
one-semester course of Independent Work without incurring a failure for
Independent Work in the fall term.
MAE 339/340 Independent Work (Fall/Spring)
MAE 339D/340D Independent Work with Design (Fall/Spring) 4
MAE 440 Senior Project (Spring) 5
MAE 440D Senior Project with Design (Spring) 4,5
MAE 442 Senior Thesis (Spring)5
MAE 442D Senior Thesis with Design (Spring) 4,5
None of the Department requirements can be taken on a pass/fail or audit
1 Required for Mechanical Engineers and Aerospace Engineers.
2 MAE 322 or MAE 412 required for Mechanical Engineers.
3 MAE 332 or MAE 342 required for Aerospace Engineers.
4 May also satisfy one Engineering Design requirement.
5 Year-long project with enrollment in spring semester only
6
basis. All requests for substitution, other than those listed under the
Engineering Physics Program (Section E), must be approved by the
Departmental Representative in advance.
4. The Engineering School requirements in the humanities and social
sciences must also be met (a minimum of seven courses covering four
distinct areas from the six areas offered). See the Undergraduate
Announcement for full description and distribution areas. In addition a
one semester writing course is required. This course is typically
completed in the freshman year.
5. ABET (Accreditation Board of Engineering Technology) departmental
requirements for humanities and social sciences must also be met by
one of four following methods:
• 3 non-language courses in a Humanities or Social Science department or
a single distribution area
• 2 non-language courses in a single Humanities or Social Science
department or a single distribution area which is beyond the
introductory level
• 1 course at the 300-400 level in a single Humanities or Social Science
distribution area
• completion of the AB foreign language requirement by taking one or more
courses of language study at the 107/108 or above level.
D. General Information
Students are encouraged to elect more than the one required semester of
independent work (with or without design) as part of their plan of study, and to
participate in the extensive research programs of the Department.
Additional technical courses (which may include both undergraduate and
graduate courses) can be used to pursue a specialty within the Department in
greater depth.
It is also possible to participate in a variety of interdepartmental
programs or expand one's studies in the humanities or social sciences beyond
the seven courses required by the School of Engineering and Applied Science.
7
Professional Ethics
Professional ethics is an important topic for all engineers. Honor code,
adherence to University Regulations and adherence to rules in individual
courses and laboratories are all part of our student’s exposure to professional
ethical matters. In addition, aspects of engineering ethics are considered in
engineering courses through examples and case studies. Given that
mechanical and aerospace engineering works have impact on society, the
concepts of economical and safe design are foundations of ethical conduct of
practitioners in the field. Students are urged to understand ethical guidelines
further in the mechanical and aerospace fields as defined by the engineering
societies:
ASME (http://www.asme.org/Governance/Society_Policies.cfm
Scroll to Policy 15.7 Ethics (available in PDF or Word format)
AIAA (http://www.aiaa.org/content.cfm?pageid=198)
Code of Ethics
Honors
The determination of honors upon graduation is made by the faculty of
the Department based primarily on the grade average achieved during junior
and senior year in both required and elective technical courses. The student’s
overall academic record and performance in independent work is also
considered.
The completion of all the Departmental requirements, together with an
average of 2.0* or better in the Departmental courses will lead to a
Departmental recommendation that the student graduate. The decision to
deny a recommendation for graduation, to any student failing to meet the
criteria above, will be made by the Departmental faculty on the basis of a full
review of the student's record.
*The grade average will be computed on the basis of equal weighing of
the grades in the Departmental courses within the following numerical
equivalents: A+ = 4.0, A = 4.0, A- = 3.7, B+ = 3.3, B = 3.0, B- = 2.7, C+ = 2.3,
C = 2.0, C- = 1.7, D = 1.0, F = 0.0
8
III. RECOMMENDED SAMPLE CURRICULA
Each student's program is planned individually in consultation with their
advisor or the Departmental Representative. Sample curricula for the major
options within the Department are presented later in this booklet. These
sample curricula should be used as recommendations only. Individual
variations are possible (and encouraged) as long as the Departmental
requirements are satisfied.
A. Course Descriptions
Descriptions of the courses offered appear in the Undergraduate
Announcement or the Graduate School Announcement, as appropriate.
Additional information can be obtained by contacting the instructor in charge.
The list below summarizes information on prerequisites and other background
for each of the undergraduate upper level courses in the Department. The
following information is intended to assist the student in the selection of
courses in the upper class years.
305 Mathematics in Engineering I (Fall/Spring) (Ordinary Differential
Equations) - requires MAT 201 and MAT 202 as prerequisites with
the possibility that MAT 202 may be taken concurrently. This
course should be taken as early as possible in the student's
program. Required for all Mechanical and Aerospace
Engineering majors.
306 Mathematics in Engineering II (Spring) (Partial Differential
Equations and Complex Variables) - requires MAE 305 as an
absolute prerequisite. This course satisfies the second
mathematics requirement in the department and in the
Engineering Physics Program and is recommended for those
planning to go to graduate school in engineering or applied
science.
321/322 Engineering Design/Mechanical Design (Fall/Spring) - Requires
only the sophomore curriculum. MAE 321 is required for all
Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering students. Either MAE
322 or MAE 412 is required for all Mechanical Engineering
students.
324 Structure and Properties of Materials (Fall). SEAS freshman
requirements of chemistry, physics, and math are prerequisites.
Either MAE 324, MAE 334 or MSE 301 is required for all
Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering majors.
9
325 Structural Analysis and Intro to Finite Element Methods (Fall) –
[CEE 361] requires only sophomore Modern Solid Mechanics (MAE 223).
Required of all Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering
students.
328 Energy for a Greenhouse-Constrained World (Spring) –
Recommended for students interested in energy production and its
influence on the environment. Requires MAE 221/222 as
prerequisites.
331/332 Aircraft Flight Dynamics/Aircraft Design (Fall/Spring) - Requires
the sophomore curriculum. Simultaneous enrollment in Fluid
Dynamics (MAE 335) is desirable, although it is not required.
Required for Aerospace Engineering majors. Optionally, MAE
341/342 may be taken to satisfy this requirement. (MAE
331/332 and MAE 341/342 are offered in alternate years.)
334 Materials Selection and Design [Fall] – Requires Modern Solid
Mechanics [MAE 223]. Either MAE 324, MAE 334 or MSE 301 is
required for all Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering majors.
335 Fluid Dynamics (Fall) - requires only the sophomore curriculum as
a prerequisite and Mathematics in Engineering I (MAE 305) as a
co-requisite. Required for Aerospace Engineering majors. MAE
335 or MAE 423 is required for all Mechanical Engineering
students.
336 Viscous Flows (Spring) - requires only the sophomore curriculum
and Mathematics in Engineering I (MAE 305) as a prerequisite.
339/340 Independent work is intended for juniors or seniors doing only a
one term project. Students develop a topic of their own or select
from a list of topics prepared by the faculty. They develop a work
plan and select an adviser and a second reader. Registration for
the course is accomplished at normal course selection time, while
topic and advisor can be selected at any time prior to the end of
the first two weeks of the appropriate semester.
10
339D/340D Independent work with design is intended for juniors or seniors
doing only a one term project. Similar to 339/340, with the
principal difference that the project must incorporate aspects and
principles of design in a system, product, vehicle, device,
apparatus, or other design element. Registration for the course is
accomplished at normal course selection time, while topic and
advisor can be selected at any time prior to the end of the first two
weeks of the appropriate semester. Appropriateness of the design
aspects of the project is subject to approval by the
Departmental Representative.
341/342 Space Flight/Space System Design (Fall/Spring) – MAE 341
requires Calculus and MAE 305 or permission of instructor. MAE
342 requires MAE 305 and MAE 341 is recommended. Required
for Aerospace Engineering majors. Optionally, MAE 331/332
may be taken to satisfy this requirement. (MAE 331/332 and
MAE 341/342 are offered in alternate years.)
344 Introduction to Bioengineering and Medical Devices [Spring] – MAE
344 requires MAT 103, MAT 104, PHY 103 and PHY 104.
345 Robotics and Intelligent Systems [Fall] – MAE 345 is an optional
core requirement of the Robotics and Intelligent Systems
Certificate Program. This courses requires MAT 202 or MAT 204
and COS 111, or COS 126, or ORF 201.
412 Microprocessors for Measurement and Control (Spring) - requires
satisfactory completion of the departmental electronics
requirement. Often taken in junior year by those with potential
interest in senior independent work in this area. Either MAE 322
or MAE 412 is required for all Mechanical Engineering
students.
423 Heat Transfer (Spring) - requires the standard sophomore
curriculum and MAE 305 as a co-requisite. Either MAE 423 or
MAE 335 is required for all Mechanical Engineering students.
425 Introduction to Physical Oceanography (Fall) - requires MAT 202
[GEO 425] as a prerequisite.
426 Rocket and Air-Breathing Propulsion Technology (Spring) –
Prerequisites: MAE 221 and MAE 222. Either MAE 426 or MAE
427 is required for all Aerospace Engineering students.
427 Fossil Fuel Energy Conversion: Mobile Power Plants (Fall) -
requires only the sophomore prerequisites. Either MAE 427 or
MAE 426 is required for all Aerospace Engineering students.
11
433 Automatic Control Systems (Spring) - Mathematics in Engineering I
(MAE 305) in addition to sophomore curriculum is a prerequisite.
Required of all Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering
students.
434 Modern Control (Spring) - A useful complement to MAE 433,
treating more advanced topics in control system design. MAE 433
is a prerequisite.
440 Senior Project (Spring) - The senior project is a year long
independent study intended for students who choose to work in
teams of two or more. Work begins in the fall, but enrollment is
only in spring term when a double grade is awarded. Groups
develop their own topic or select a topic from a list of topics
prepared by the faculty. Groups develop a work plan and select an
advisor and a second reader for their work.
440D Senior Project with Design (Spring) - Similar to 440 with the
principal difference that the team or group project must
incorporate aspects and principals of design, whether for a system,
product, vehicle, device, software, or apparatus. The year-long
senior project with design may be used satisfy a portion of the
department's design requirement. Appropriateness of the design
aspects of the project is subject to approval by the
Departmental Representative.
442 Senior Thesis (Spring) - The senior thesis is an independent study
for individual students. Work begins in the fall, but enrollment is
only in spring term when a double grade is awarded. Students
develop their own topic or select a topic from a list of topics
prepared by the faculty. Students develop a work plan and select
an advisor and a second reader for their work.
442D Senior Thesis with Design (Spring) – Similar to 442 with the
principal difference that the thesis must incorporate aspects and
principals of design, whether for a system, product, vehicle, device,
software, or apparatus. The year-long senior thesis with design
may be used to satisfy a portion of the department's design
requirement. Appropriateness of the design aspects of the
project is subject to approval by the Departmental
Representative.
12
B. Standard Sophomore Curriculum
The recommended sophomore curriculum is common to all Departmental
students, except Engineering Physics students who are allowed certain
substitutions (see Section E).
(T.E. = Technical Elective)
(N.T.E. = Non Technical Elective)
SOPHOMORE YEAR
FALL* SPRING
Mathematics Mathematics
MAE 223 Modern Solids Mechanics MAE 206 Introduction to
MAE 221 Thermodynamics Engineering Dynamics
N.T.E. or Materials MAE 222 Mechanics of Fluids
N.T.E. MAE 224 Laboratory
N.T.E
The School of Engineering and Applied Science computer programming
requirement must be satisfied by the end of the Sophomore Year.
Some sample programs are presented to indicate the major options
within the Department
*Note that the course load for this recommended curriculum is heavier in the
fall than in the spring. MAE 221 has a laboratory whereas MAE 222 does not.
Instead, the laboratory in the spring is listed as a separate course, MAE 224.
The time commitment for MAE 224 is about one-half of a regular course.
Therefore, the course load in the fall is about 5 ½ courses whereas the course
load in the spring is about 4 ½ courses. The course grade in MAE 224 is
determined from the laboratory course work from both the fall and spring
terms.
13
C. Mechanical Engineering
Students desiring an emphasis on design and analysis of the dynamics
and control of engineering devices can follow the Dynamics Systems and
Design Option. Students desiring an emphasis on power generation and
conversion can elect to follow the Energy Sciences Option. It is however not
necessary to rigidly follow either of these options as long as the requirements in
Section II are satisfied.
1. Dynamic Systems and Design (Typical program)
JUNIOR YEAR
FALL SPRING
MAE 325 Structural Analysis & Mathematics Elective
Intro to Finite Element Methods T.E. or MSE 301 Materials Science
MAE 321 Engineering Design and Engineering
MAE 324 Structure and Properties MAE 412 Microprocessors for
of Materials or T.E. Measurement and Control
N.T.E. MAE 433 Automatic Control
N.T.E. Systems
T.E./N.T.E.
SENIOR YEAR
FALL SPRING
Senior Thesis with or without Senior Thesis with or without
Design Design
MAE 345 Robotics and Intelligent MAE 423 Heat Transfer
Systems* MAE 322 Mechanical Design
T.E./N.T.E. N.T.E.
N.T.E.
* Normally MAE 345 is offered in
alternate years – plan accordingly.
14
SUGGESTED TECHNICAL ELECTIVES
FALL SPRING
MAE 331 Aircraft Flight Dynamics MAE 328 Energy for a Greenhouse-
MAE 341 Space Flight Constrained World
MAE 335 Fluid Dynamics MAE 332 Aircraft Design
MAE 345 Robotics and Intelligent MAE 342 Space System Design
Systems MAE 344 Introduction to
MAE 427 Mobile Power Plants Bioengineering and
CEE 361 Structural Analysis and Medical Devices
Introduction to Finite- MAE 412 Microprocessors for
Element Methods Measurement & Control
MAE 434 Modern Control
CEE 461 Design of Large Scale
Structures
MAE 546 Optimal Control and
Estimation
2. Energy Sciences (Typical Program)
JUNIOR YEAR
FALL SPRING
MAE 325 Structural Analysis & Mathematics Elective
Intro to Finite Element Methods MAE 322 Mechanical Design
MAE 321 Engineering Design MSE 301 Materials Science and
MAE 427 Mobile Power Plants Engineering
T.E. T.E.
N.T.E. N.T.E.
SENIOR YEAR
FALL SPRING
MAE 335 Fluid Dynamics MAE 328 Energy for a Greenhouse-
MAE 339 Independent Work with Constrained World
Design MAE 423 Heat Transfer
T.E. MAE 433 Automatic Control
N.T.E. Systems
N.T.E. N.T.E.
15
SUGGESTED TECHNICAL ELECTIVES
FALL SPRING
MAE 527 Physics of Gases I MAE 412 Microprocessors for
MAE 331 Aircraft Flight Dynamics Measurement and Control
MAE 341 Space Flight MAE 426 Rockets and Air-Breathing
Propulsion Technology
MAE 531 Combustion
MAE 332 Aircraft Design
MAE 342 Space System Design
SUGGESTED NON-TECHNICAL ELECTIVES
FALL SPRING
ECO 100 Introduction to ECO 101 Introduction to
Microeconomics Macroeconomics
3. General Mechanical Engineering
Students not wishing to specialize in either one of the areas above (1 or
2) can select any mix of the two sample curricula, provided they meet the
requirements stated in Section II.
16
D. Aerospace Engineering
Students wishing to concentrate their study on vehicles in air and space
follow the curriculum in Aerospace Engineering (see Section II for required
courses). A typical program is listed below:
JUNIOR YEAR
FALL SPRING
MAE 325 Structural Analysis and MAE 3X2 Design*
Intro to Finite Element Methods MSE 301 Materials Science and
MAE 3X1 Flight Dynamics* Engineering
MAE 321 Engineering Design T.E.
N.T.E. N.T.E.
N.T.E. N.T.E.
*(Note: Either MAE 331 Aircraft Flight *(Note: Either MAE 332 Aircraft Design
Dynamics -or- MAE 341 Space Flight -or- MAE 342 Space System Design
SENIOR YEAR
FALL SPRING
MAE 427 Mobile Power Plants MAE 412 or MAE 434 (See list of
Senior Independent Work with technical electives below)
Design MAE 433 Automatic Control
MAE 335 Fluid Dynamics Systems
N.T.E N.T.E.
Continuation of Independent Work
or Senior Thesis
SUGGESTED TECHNICAL ELECTIVES
FALL SPRING
• MSE 302 Laboratory Techniques in MAE 412 Microprocessors fo


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