• The Philip W. Lown School of Near Eastern and Judaic Studies


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The Philip W. Lown School of Near Eastern and Judaic Studies
The Philip W. Lown School of Near Eastern and Judaic Studies The microfilm collection of the Jacob Rader Marcus Center of the
is the center for all programs of teaching and research in the American Jewish Archives at Brandeis University, housed in the
areas of Judaic studies, Ancient Near Eastern studies, Islamic University’s library, includes a vast array of primary sources bearing
and Modern Middle Eastern studies, and Jewish communal on American Jewish life, and supports the NEJS department’s
studies. The School includes the Department of Near Eastern American Jewish history program. For detailed descriptions of the
and Judaic Studies, the Hornstein Program for Jewish individual centers and institutes associated with the Lown School,
Communal Service, and the Cohen Center for Modern Jewish please see under the heading “Research Centers and Institutes”
Studies. Also housed in the Lown School is the National Center elsewhere in this Bulletin .
for Jewish Film (NCJF), the premier archives and circulating
library of Judaic film and video in the Diaspora. The NCJF
collection is a valuable resource for the study and
documentation of Jewish history, art, and culture.
Department of Courses of Study:
Minor
Near Eastern and Judaic Studies Major (B.A.)
Combined B.A./M.A.
Master of Arts
Doctor of Philosophy
Objectives program is available to undergraduate majors in the department. A
two-year joint M.A. program is offered in Near Eastern and Judaic
Studies and sociology, and Near Eastern and Judaic Studies and
The Department of Near Eastern and Judaic Studies bears a proud women’s studies. In addition, a three-year joint degree program
tradition of scholarly excellence in both of the fields it embraces: leading to the M.A. in Jewish communal service and M.A. in Near
the history, languages, and cultures of the Ancient Near East and Eastern and Judaic Studies is available to students of the Hornstein
the Modern Middle East, and the study of the Jewish people, Program. The Benjamin S. Hornstein Program in Jewish Communal
including its history, religion, literature, and place in Service also offers Near Eastern and Judaic Studies Ph.D. students
civilization. who have completed their residence and at least one comprehensive
examination the opportunity to apply for a one-year Certificate in
Undergraduate Major Jewish Education.
Undergraduate students are welcome to study in the department
as majors, as minors, or simply to take individual courses. Majors
find that their NEJS background serves them well in preparation How to Become an Undergraduate Major
for a great variety of graduate and professional careers. Past
majors have gone on to law and medicine, academic, or
diplomatic/professional careers related to the Ancient Near East, Students who wish to concentrate in Near Eastern and Judaic Studies
the Modern Middle East, Judaica, the rabbinate, Jewish meet with the undergraduate advising head and are assigned a faculty
education, and other professions in the Jewish community. advisor in accordance with their individual areas of interest. Together
with their advisor, they develop a plan of study designed to fulfill the
The undergraduate major in Near Eastern and Judaic Studies, requirements of the major and to meet their personal interests and
divided into two parallel tracks (see next page), is designed to needs. With the approval of the department, a limited amount of
combine a broad education in the various disciplines and periods credit may be awarded for appropriate courses taken at other
that constitute this field, with a degree of specialization in one universities. For further details, please see page 282.
specific area. It is the intent of the major also to introduce
students to the critical study of Near Eastern and Judaic sources,
classical and modern, within the academic context. Majors are How to Be Admitted to the Graduate Program
strongly encouraged to diversify their courses within the
department and to consider related courses in other departments
in order to acquaint themselves with the different disciplines and The general requirements for admission to the Graduate School, as
approaches that Near Eastern and Judaic Studies embraces. specified in an earlier section of this Bulletin , apply to candidates for
admission to this program.
(For the major in Islamic and Middle Eastern studies please see
under that heading in this Bulletin.) At the graduate level, the Department of Near Eastern and Judaic
Studies is divided into three interdisciplinary areas: Bible and Ancient
Graduate Program in Near Eastern and Judaic Studies Near East, Jewish Studies, and the Modern Middle East.
The graduate program in Near Eastern and Judaic Studies, leading
to the Doctor of Philosophy degree, is designed to train scholars
and teachers in various areas of Near Eastern and Judaic Studies.
A joint Ph.D. program is also offered in Near Eastern and Judaic
Studies and sociology. On the M.A. level, the department offers
general and specialized programs. Also, a five-year B.A./M.A.
282 Near Eastern and Judaic Studies
Faculty Sara Hascal Jonathan Sarna
Hebrew language. American Jewish history.
Marc Brettler, Chair Ellen Kellman Meir Sendor
The Bible and its interpretation. Yiddish language and literature. Jewish philosophy and thought.
Tzvi Abusch Metin Heper Sarah Shectman
Languages and cultures of Ancient Turkish politics. Comparative state politics Hebrew language.
Mesopotamia. Ancient Near Eastern and public administration.
religions. Eugene Sheppard
Reuven Kimelman Modern Jewish history and thought.
Bracha Azoulay Talmud. Midrash. Liturgy.
Hebrew language. Esther Shorr
Rena Lavie Hebrew language.
Bernadette Brooten Hebrew language.
Christian studies. Ilan Troen
Avigdor Levy Israel Studies.
Aliza Brosh Middle Eastern studies.
Hebrew language. Rina Winkelman
Kanan Makiya Hebrew language.
Andrew Cohen Middle Eastern studies.
Near Eastern archaeology. Ancient Assyria. David Wright
Archaeology of Ancient Israel. Archaeology Yitzhak Nakash Biblical studies. Languages and literatures
of Egypt/Canaan. Middle Eastern studies. of the Ancient Near East.
Jonathan Decter Bruria Neva-Hacohen The following members of other
Sephardic studies. Hebrew language. departments are affiliated with the
Department of Near Eastern and Judaic
Sharon Feiman-Nemser Antony Polonsky, M.A. Advisor Studies:
Jewish education. East European Jewish history. Holocaust
studies. Joyce Antler (AMST), Alan Avery-Peck
Sylvia Fishman, Graduate Advising Head (Department of Religious Studies, College
Contemporary Jewry and American Jewish Bonit Porath of the Holy Cross), Gerald Bernstein (FA),
sociology. Hebrew language. Eugene Black (HIST), Jacob Cohen (AMST),
Gordon Fellman (SOC), Gregory Freeze
ChaeRan Freeze, Undergraduate Advising Benjamin Ravid (HIST), Patricia Johnston (CLAS), Susan
Head Medieval and early modern Jewish history. Kahn (HIRIJW), Edward Kaplan (ROCL),
East European Jewish history. Ann Koloski-Ostrow (CLAS), Jon Levisohn
Jehuda Reinharz (ED), Wellington Nyangoni (AAAS), Joseph
Arthur Green Modern Jewish history. Reimer (JCS), Shulamit Reinharz (SOC),
Jewish thought. Sharon Rivo (National Center for Jewish
Vardit Ringvald, Director, Hebrew and Film), Carl Sheingold (JCS), Susan Shevitz
Arabic Languages (JCS), Lawrence Sternberg (JCS), Stephen
Hebrew language. Whitfield (AMST).
Franck Salameh
Arabic language.
Requirements for the Undergraduate Major Early Christianity, Rabbinic, and Medieval Jewish Studies, (3) Modern
and Contemporary Jewish Studies (including Yiddish). See Post-1750
course list under “Minor” section.
The department offers two parallel tracks for the major as
follows: D. In addition students must complete the following three Hebrew
language requirements:
1. Judaic Studies
1. Any fourth semester Hebrew course except HBRW 41a (formerly
2. Bible and Ancient Near Eastern Studies HBRW 42a). Exemptions will be granted only to those students who
place out on the basis of the Hebrew placement test administered by
Judaic Studies Track the Hebrew program at Brandeis.
A. Students must complete NEJS 5a (formerly NEJS 1a)
(Foundational Course in Judaic Studies) as early as possible in the 2. One course in classical Hebrew from among the following: HBRW
major. This course is usually offered every year. 122a (formerly HBRW 101a), HBRW 122b (formerly HBRW 101b),
NEJS 10a (formerly NEJSº72a), 25a (fomerly 53b), 110b, 114a, 114b,
B. Students must complete at least seven other courses in Near 115a, 117b, 118b, 121b (formerly131b), 122b, 123b, 125b, 126a
Eastern and Judaic Studies, at least three of which must be (formerly 120b), 126b.
taught by members of the NEJS faculty. Up to four may be cross-
listed courses or courses taken at other universities. Courses 3. One course in modern Hebrew literature from among the following:
used to fulfill the Hebrew requirement (D on the right) do not HBRW 123a (formerly 110a), 123b (formerly 110b), 143a (formerly
count toward the fulfillment of this requirement. 111a), 143b (formerly 111b), 144a (formerly 109a), 146a (formerly
107a), 164b (formerly HBRW 104b), 166b (formerly 107b), 167b
C. Students must complete at least one of their seven courses in (formerly 108b), NEJS 177b (formerly NEJS 139b), 178a, 180b.
each of the following three chronological periods: (1) Biblical and
Ancient Near Eastern Studies, (2) Early Post-Biblical Judaism, In no case may courses used to fulfill the Hebrew requirement count
toward fulfillment of any other departmental requirement.
Near Eastern and Judaic Studies 283
Bible and Ancient Near Eastern Studies Track advisor before taking courses outside of Near Eastern and Judaic
A. Students must complete NEJS 5a (fomerly NEJS 1b) (The Bible Studies. An undergraduate honors thesis may not be accepted for
and the Ancient Near East) as early as possible in the major or M.A. credit in this program.
NEJS 8a (The Bible in its Near Eastern Context).
B. Students must complete at least seven other courses in Bible Evaluation of Transfer Credits
and Ancient Near Eastern studies, at least four of which must
be taught by members of the NEJS faculty. Up to three courses
may be taken in other departments at Brandeis or at other A. By departmental rule a maximum of four semester course credits
universities. Courses used to fulfill the language requirement for courses taken at other universities may be accepted toward the
(E below) do not count toward the fulfillment of this departmental major requirements. Each course transferred from
requirement. another university must have the approval of the department in order
to be acceptable for credit toward the major requirements. This rule
C. Students must select one of the following areas as their area of applies to courses completed at any other institution, whether in the
specialization, and in it complete at least three courses of the United States or abroad.
above-mentioned seven courses:
B. No more than two courses taken at special programs for overseas
1. The Hebrew Bible/Ancient Israel students may be applied. Students are encouraged to seek advanced
approval from the department’s undergraduate advising head for all
2. Mesopotamia (The civilization of Sumer, Babylon, and Assyria) courses intended for transfer credit.
3. Northwest Semitic Cultures
C . Credit is not granted for Ulpan courses, but students may take the
4. Second Temple Judaism and Early Christianity Hebrew Placement Test administered by the Hebrew program at
Brandeis.
A list of courses in each area may be found in the departmental
office. D. Students may be offered advanced standing on the basis of studies
completed elsewhere. Students with the appropriate background and
D. As part of the seven courses, students must complete at least ability, for example, may place out of Hebrew language requirement.
one course in each of the following areas: (1) the Hebrew Bible/ However, those who wish to move into the advanced text courses
Ancient Israel; (2) Mesopotamia; (3) Christianity or Judaism in still need to take the Hebrew placement exam. In addition, students
late antiquity; (4) an area outside of NEJS that broadens the entering Brandeis for the first time, who are non-native speakers of
contextual or methodological horizons of Near Eastern study Hebrew, who have studied at yeshivot or comparable institutions, or
(e.g., in classics, linguistics, anthropology, or literary theory), to in other non-college-level programs, and who have demonstrated
be determined in consultation with the student’s advisor. advanced knowledge in the regular Brandeis Hebrew Placement Exam
will be granted the opportunity to take an additional advanced
E. Students must study two languages of the ancient world, such placement exam for credit. Upon successful completion of that exam,
as Akkadian, Aramaic, Greek, biblical Hebrew, Hittite, Ugaritic, a student will receive one course credit. This opportunity is available
or another approved ancient language. One language, generally to students only at the time they first enter Brandeis. In addition,
Akkadian or Hebrew, must be studied to the fourth-semester students who pass the Jerusalem Exam with a total of 91 or greater,
level, and another to the second-semester level. In no case may and who pass the Brandeis University Hebrew Placement Exam,
courses used to fulfill this language requirement count toward thereby gaining exemption from the Hebrew Language program will
the fulfillment of any other departmental requirement. Students receive one course credit.
who choose biblical Hebrew as the main language, after taking
(or testing out of) first year modern Hebrew, must take a course
in biblical grammar and a biblical text course. Grammar courses Requirements for the Minor in Near Eastern and Judaic
include NEJS 10a (fomerly NEJS 72a) and Hebrew 122a (formerly Studies
101a) and 122b (formerly 101b). (NEJS 10a [formerly NEJS 72a]
may be taken as a third semester course.)
The minor consists of a coherent set of five courses in Near Eastern
Honors and Judaic Studies, of which two may be cross-listed courses or
Satisfactory completion of NEJS 99d (Senior Research) is required courses taken at other universities.
of candidates for degrees with honors. Students proposing to seek
honors should petition the department no later than September A. At least one of the five courses must focus on the period before
of their senior year. 1750, and one on the period after 1750.
Pre-1750: IMES 104a, NEJS 5a (formerly NEJS 1a), 1b, 10a (formerly
Combined B.A./M.A. Program 72a), 25a (formerly 53b), 102a, 104b, 106a, 106b, 101a (formerly 108a),
104a (formerly 108b), 110a, 111a, 112a, 113a, 113b, 114a, 114b, 115a,
115b, 116a (formerly 156b), 116b, 117b, 118b, 122b, 123a, 123b, 125b,
Qualified Brandeis University seniors are invited to apply for 126a (formerly 120b), 126b, 127b, 129a, 130a, 131b, 132a, 133a, 140a,
admission to the department’s five-year program leading to a 140b, 142b, 147a, 148b, 151b, 152a, 125b, 153b, 154a, 155a, 155b,
master’s degree in the fifth year. To qualify for admission to the 158b, 159a (formerly 105b), 159b (formerly 119a), 165b (formerly
program, students must have spent at least two years in 124b), 184a (formerly 109a), 192b (formerly 130b).
residence at Brandeis, and must complete all B.A. requirements,
including NEJS major requirements, by the end of their fourth Post-1750: REL 107a, NEJS 35a (formerly NEJS 68b), 75a (formerly
year. Students accepted into the program may apply toward the 86b), 133a, 136a (formerly 168a), 136b (formerly 168b), 137a
master’s degree up to seven NEJS courses (or approved cross- (formerly 169a), 137b (formerly 167b), 141a (formerly 112b), 141b,
listed courses) numbered 100 or above in which they have 142a (formerly 120a), 143a (formerly 121a), 144a, 145a (formerly
received at least the grade of B-. During their fifth year, which 157a), 146a (formerly 162b), 150b (formerly 107b), 151a, 153a, 158a,
must be spent in residence, students must complete seven 160a (formerly 119b), 160b (formerly 134b), 161a, 162a, 163a, 163b
additional courses with a grade of at least B-, of which four must (formerly 138b), 164b, 165a (formerly 170b), 167a, 172a, 173a, 173b,
be in Near Eastern and Judaic Studies, as well as their qualifying 174a, 174b, 175a (formerly 129b), 175b (formerly 169b), 176a, 176b,
examination. Fulfillment of the departmental B.A. language 177a (formerly 135b), 177b (formerly 139b), 178a, 180b, 181a
requirement constitutes fulfillment of the B.A./M.A. language (formerly 190b), 181b (formerly 194b), 182a (formerly 191b), 185b
requirement. Students must obtain prior approval from the M.A. (formerly 145b), 187a (formerly 148a), 187b (formerly 143b), 188b
284 Near Eastern and Judaic Studies
(formerly 146b), 189a (formerly 147b), 189b (formerly 161b), 190a Thesis
(formerly 171b), 196a, 197a, 197b, 198a (formerly 100a), A Master’s thesis is not required in the Department of Near Eastern
YDSH 10a, 20b, 30a, 40b. and Judaic Studies. Students may petition to write a thesis that must
be submitted no later than April 1 of the year in which the degree is
B. No more than two of the following semester courses may be to be conferred.
applied toward the minor: YDSH 10a (Beginning Yiddish), YDSH
20b (Continuing Yiddish), ARBC 10a (Beginning Literary Arabic),
and ARBC 20b (Continuing Literary Arabic). Requirements for the Three-Year Joint Master’s Program:
Hornstein/NEJS
C. Students are required to declare the minor in NEJS no later
than the beginning of the senior year. Each student declaring a
minor will be assigned a departmental advisor after conferring
with the undergraduate advising head. Program of Study
This degree is for students accepted into the Hornstein Program who
D. By departmental rule, a maximum of two semester course seek a more intensive level of Judaic studies than is normally
credits for courses taken at other universities, whether in the available in the two-year curriculum. It is recommended for students
United States or abroad, may be accepted toward the minor in interested in Jewish education. Students who enroll in the three-year
NEJS. Students are encouraged to seek advance approval from the program devote most of their first year to Judaic studies and must
department’s undergraduate advisor for all courses intended for take at least one additional NEJS course in each of their remaining
transfer credit . For courses taken in Israeli universities, one two years. These must be regular graduate (100- or 200-level) NEJS
Brandeis semester credit will be given for a three-hour-per-week courses and HBRW courses, not courses primarily geared for Jewish
one-semester course; a two-semester, two-hour-per-week course; communal service students, and only one of the courses may deal
or two, two-hour, one-semester courses. Credit is not granted for primarily with the contemporary period. NEJS and HBRW course
Ulpan courses, but students may take the Hebrew Placement selections must be approved by the NEJS faculty member overseeing
Test administered by the Hebrew program at Brandeis. this program.
In their first year, students complete six NEJS courses and one JCS
course. In their second year, students complete one NEJS course and
Requirements for the Diploma in Jewish Studies seven JCS courses and in the summer complete the Israel Seminar
(JCS 350a, Foster Seminar in Israel on Contemporary Jewish Life), and
individualized supplemental Judaica study in Israel (SSIP). In their
Residence Requirement third year, students complete one NEJS course (that may be a reading
One year of full-time study, consisting of eight courses tailored course to prepare for the comprehensive exam) and six JCS courses.
to the needs of the student.
Admission
Comprehensive Examination Applicants must submit a single application in duplicate to the
The student will be examined at the end of the year. Hornstein/NEJS joint master’s degree program.
Residence Requirement
Requirements for the Degree of Master of Arts The residence requirement is two years of full-time study; in the
third year the student has post-resident status.
Residence Requirement and Program of Study Language Requirement
Ordinarily, two years of full-time residence are required at the All candidates are required to demonstrate proficiency in biblical or
normal course rate of seven courses each academic year. At least modern Hebrew.
eight of these required courses must be offered by members of
the Near Eastern and Judaic Studies department. Students may Advising
not include courses taken to prepare for the M.A. language Students are assigned advisors from the Near Eastern and Judaic
examination (HBRW 102 and below, or ARBC 40 and below) Studies department and from the Hornstein Program. Students must
among these eight courses, but may include them among the meet with their advisor(s) regularly, and before enrolling in courses,
required 14 courses. Students must obtain prior approval from to ensure appropriate course coherency.
the M.A. advisor before taking courses outside of Near Eastern
and Judaic Studies. Students who enter with graduate credit from
other recognized institutions may apply for transfer credit for up Requirements for the Joint Degree of Master of Arts in
to four courses, or, with prior approval of the M.A. advisor,
candidates may receive transfer credit for up to four courses at a
Near Eastern and Judaic Studies and Sociology
university abroad.
Advising Residence Requirement and Program of Study
Students are assigned advisors from the Near Eastern and Judaic Ordinarily, two years of full-time residence are required at the normal
Studies department. Students must meet with their advisor(s) course rate of seven courses each academic year. Students who enter
regularly, and before enrolling in courses, to ensure appropriate with graduate credit from other recognized institutions may apply for
course coherency. transfer credit for up to four courses, or, with prior approval of the
M.A. advisor, candidates may receive transfer credit for up to four
Language Requirement courses at a university abroad.
All candidates are required to demonstrate proficiency in biblical
or modern Hebrew or Arabic. Candidates may not apply toward Students will normally take seven courses each year (14 courses in
their required courses any language courses taught outside of total). Six of these courses must be offered by or cross-listed with the
NEJS, without prior permission. sociology department, and must include two graduate-level courses:
one in methods and one in theory. The remaining eight courses must
Comprehensive Examination be offered by or cross-listed with the Near Eastern and Judaic Studies
All candidates for the Master of Arts degree are required to pass a department, and at least six of these courses must be offered by NEJS
comprehensive examination. faculty. Students may not include among these courses any courses
taken to prepare for the M.A. language examination.
Near Eastern and Judaic Studies 285
Advising may vary with the academic calendar.) Once the project is found to be
Students are assigned advisors from the sociology department of acceptable M.A. degree quality, one copy of the project should be
and from the Near Eastern and Judaic Studies department. Both submitted to the Women’s Studies Program office, and an additional
advisors will work with the student to ensure appropriate course copy should be deposited in the Brandeis Library.
coherency. An interdepartmental meeting involving both
advisors and the student should take place at least once a year.
Requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy
Language Requirement
All candidates are required to demonstrate proficiency in Modern
Hebrew or Arabic. Doctoral Programs
Students admitted to the NEJS Ph.D. program are admitted to specific
Comprehensive Examination programs within the department. These are: Bible and Ancient Near
All candidates are required to pass an oral comprehensive East (BANE), Modern Middle East (MME), and Jewish Studies (JS).
examination, which is administered by a committee composed of Movement from one program to the other is generally discouraged
faculty from the NEJS and sociology departments. and is dependent upon a student’s meeting the requirements for
admission into that program and acceptance by that program’s
Research Papers faculty. Movement from one advisor to another within a program is
Students submit two, graduate-level research papers, which may likewise dependent upon the consent of the new advisor.
have been previously submitted as part of their course work.
These papers are read by a faculty committee from the NEJS and Residence Requirement and Program of Study
sociology departments. Three years of full-time residence are required at the normal rate of at
least seven term courses each academic year. Students who enter
with graduate credit from other recognized institutions may apply for
Requirements for the Joint Degree of Master of Arts in transfer credit. By rule of the Graduate School, a maximum of one
Near Eastern and Judaic Studies and Women’s Studies year of credit (seven term courses) may be accepted toward the
residence requirement on the recommendation of the departmental
advisor in consultation with the student’s advisor.
Students interested in the joint two-year terminal M.A. degree
program must first be admitted to the M.A. degree program in Teaching Requirement
NEJS in the regular manner. As part of the graduate training program in NEJS, all Ph.D. students
are required to fulfill six, semester-length teaching fellow
Residence Requirement and Program of Study assignments during the first four years of their programs, serving as
Ordinarily, two years of full-time residence are required at the apprentices to faculty mentors. In addition, the department holds an
normal course rate of seven courses each academic year. Students orientation program for all new students and sponsors colloquia on
who enter with graduate credit from other recognized teaching. Their faculty mentors evaluate students’ teaching fellow
institutions may apply for transfer credit for up to four courses, work each semester. Students’ teaching portfolios are in part drawn
or, with prior approval of the M.A. advisor, candidates may from these evaluations.
receive transfer credit for up to four courses at a university
abroad. Consortium
Students should also discuss with their advisors the desirability of
Courses must include the designated foundational course in taking courses at member institutions of the Boston Consortium.
women’s studies, one women’s studies course in NEJS, one
women’s studies course outside of NEJS, and the year-long, Advising
noncredit, eight-part Women’s Studies Colloquium Series. The Students are assigned advisors from the Near Eastern and Judaic
remaining courses must be jointly approved by each student’s Studies department in the program to which they were admitted.
NEJS advisor and by the NEJS women’s studies advisor. Students must meet with their advisor(s) regularly, and before
enrolling in courses, to ensure appropriate course coherency. The
Advising programs for each graduate area may be found in the departmental
Students are assigned advisors from the Near Eastern and Judaic office, and are posted on the departmental website.
Studies department and from the Women’s Studies Program.
Students must meet with their advisor(s) regularly, and before Funding and Annual Evaluation
enrolling in courses, to assure appropriate course coherency. Scholarships and fellowships are generally renewable for three
additional years (four for students in the program in Bible and
Language Requirement Ancient Near Eastern studies), based on a favorable annual evaluation
All candidates are required to demonstrate proficiency in biblical by each student’s professors by May of each academic year. These
or modern Hebrew or in Arabic. evaluations will be shared with the students and will be part of the
official file, along with grades. Additionally, University Dissertation
Comprehensive Examination Fellowships are available on a University-wide competitive basis for
All candidates for the Master of Arts degree are required to pass a the final year.
comprehensive examination.
Language Requirements
Thesis or Research Project Candidates are required to establish competence in Hebrew or Arabic
Students receiving a joint M.A. degree in women’s studies and as well as in two other languages, normally French and German.
NEJS must complete a research project on an issue connected to (Students in Modern Middle East must pass an examination in only
women’s studies. This project must be at least 25 pages long, in a one of these languages.) These exams are administered by the
format suitable for submission to a specific journal or for students’ advisors. Additional languages may be required as necessary
presentation at a professional conference. It may be a revision of for research in each individual candidate’s program, as determined by
a paper previously completed while enrolled in the M.A. degree their field.
program at Brandeis. It must concern a topic relevant to NEJS
and to women’s studies. The project is read by two faculty Candidates are not normally admitted to the Ph.D. program in Jewish
members within NEJS and by an additional member of the Studies, including modern and American Jewish studies, until they
Women’s Studies Program Committee. It must be defended


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